Looking for advice about school.

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My daughter is 6 and has cerebral palsy. She is having a terrible time at school because the teacher won't let her go to the toilet during lesson time.

Yesterday she came out bursting for a wee because the teacher hadn't let her go 5 mins after lunch and made her wait until hometime

Any tips for dealing with this x
Hi Kelly,
I'm assuming your daughter attends a mainstream school?

In the first instance ask for an appointment to meet with the class teacher and explain to her why your daughter needs to be allowed to go to the toilet, she might not know much about CP and how much harder it is for your daughter to hold on. Perhaps emphasise that if she doesn't let her go - there might be an accident and how embarrassing it would be for your daughter. She won't want a puddle to deal with! Also explain how holding on affects your daughter's ability to learn.

If this doesn't help ( and it should,) then make an appointment to see the SENCO or inclusion manager and explain that your daughter is entitled to reasonable adjustments being made.

It shouldn't need to get this far, but if all else fails, make an appointment to see the headteacher.

Kelly, I can see this from both sides, as I'm both a teacher and a parent of someone with special needs. Teachers are under enormous pressure in schools and us parents spend a lot of our lives advocating for our children.

Let us know how you get on.

Melly1
Dreadful. It's a basic human need. I think the school should be offering a lot of support to her, to educate her more about this, and reassuring her, not making it an issue.
Maybe someone should remind her BEFORE the lesson starts. She might simply forget because she's been playing in the playground, she is only six, after all.
She might also need a bit of support to learn about how much to drink and when. Does it tend to go "straight through", if so, a drink at the beginning of playtime, rather than at the end, might be better.
However, the last thing she needs is to be dehydrated.
Even letting her sit by the door so she can leave the classroom with as little fuss as possible would help?
I'm sure there must be others in the school who might have difficulty in this area.
The school might even like to raise the subject in assembly or similar, on the subject of bodily functions, so she isn't singled out?