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How will Liz Truss help us? - Page 2 - Carers UK Forum

How will Liz Truss help us?

Socialise and chat about other areas of your life
No, they really don't like doing what I call a proper salad.
Even when I've given them a recipe for his favourite mixed salad, which his keyworker tasted and liked so much that she made it herself for her family, it didn't mean it went on the menu.
He loves Waitrose olive rolls, there is a Waitrose within walking distance, they won't support him to buy there, or shop there. They sell his favourite live yoghurt, they won't buy that either, or his favourite tomatoes. He can easily afford these things. When we went to the Isle of Wight on holiday, he asked me if there was a Waitrose there? Yes, a new one in East Cowes.
"Great, then I can get some olive rolls" was his immediate response.
I've even given him some frozen rolls, but staff won't remind him they are there - his brain damage means his memory doesn't always work perfectly for things like this, but in other ways it's better than mine! When home with me for under 3 weeks he lost 13lbs without feeling hungry, he put it all back on in 2 months. I even left a breakdown of what he'd been eating, and an accompanying shopping plan, on the noticeboard. Waste of time. Never referred to.
The issue is their understanding of the Mental Capacity Act, BB. They can advise but M can override. Of course, if they don't give him concrete choices, or he has favourite meals, he'll almost certainly go with the favourite options or the one first thought of. We had to get a Best Interests Meeting to look at whether restricting his diet choices to keep Mike's weight stable, and the psychiatrist determined that Mike didn't understand the concept of healthy eating sufficiently to make informed choices, so it was agreed he didn't have sufficient capacity, and we used the Best Interests Meeting to agree on reducing portion sizes, except for veggie portions. We then had to educate the staff to remind them that potatoes are carbohydrates and therefore not part of the "increase veggies" mantra.
The 'Mental Capacity ' thing is my great frustration. What I find so very hard is that the medical profession say my husband has it, even though at times he is a danger not just to himself but to me!
No account seems to be taken of the people trying to care for the people who have 'mental capacity' and they always seems to be given 'benefit of the doubt' partially due to lack of alternatives and funding - My own GP actually told me this years ago. It seems a tragedy or crisis has to occur for someone to be deemed lacking in Mental Capacity!

Does anyone know if the extra fuel allowance of £300 will still be paid after the energy annoucement yesterday? Also will those on Attendance Allowance still get the extra £150? If so then as long as we are careful, I should be able to cope with the Winter heating bills providing we do not really have a bad Winter.
S's college are the same and are always pulling the MC/free choice thing too re healthy food options. They also think that anything served with salad must be healthy ....

Helena, according to Martin Lewis who explains things well https://www.moneysavingexpert.com/news/ ... iz-truss-/ yes the £300 payment for pensioners and the £150 for the disabled plus the £400 for every household will still be paid.

Melly1
Hi everyone

Mental Capacity is a thorny subject. People who have been trained in it can easily get it wrong, but there are some principles involved here that might help.

1. Mental capacity is fluid. You can have capacity one minute and lose it the next. A mental capacity test has to allow for that and give the person every opportunity to make a decision themselves by choosing the best time, circumstances and communication methods for that person. My Mum still had capacity for a while but there was no way we could ask her to decide something in the first half hour after she'd woken up. She was far too confused.

2. Mental capacity is about making an informed decision. That means understanding what is a healthy diet and the consequences of not following one. It means not following an obsessive diet but going through the whole process of taking in and understanding the facts, weighing those facts and communicating a decision. My son, Mike, doesn't understand a healthy diet. If you use the word diet at all in his presence, he'll think he's going to be starved. So the first thing he'll do is refuse to discuss a diet. My late mother in law was diabetic - very late onset, sometime in her mid-70s. She refused to follow a strict diet on the grounds that she was not going to benefit massively with lots of extra years by behaving and would rather enjoy her time. She died at 85, and still enjoyed her own choices in food. I had quite an argument with CQC over that one, but we won.

3. 90% of the disputes I've seen over mental capacity were around the weighing up of facts, especially in people with autism. Many people on the spectrum can handle the facts but will make their decision based on routine or obsession without considering the facts. Proving that one kept my sister safe in hospital for a few extra days.
Many people on the spectrum can handle the facts but will make their decision based on routine
so true.

Melly1
...and that means that their capacity is impaired.
Charles_2112 wrote:
Sat Sep 10, 2022 7:42 am
Hi everyone

Mental Capacity is a thorny subject. People who have been trained in it can easily get it wrong, but there are some principles involved here that might help.

1. Mental capacity is fluid. You can have capacity one minute and lose it the next. A mental capacity test has to allow for that and give the person every opportunity to make a decision themselves by choosing the best time, circumstances and communication methods for that person. My Mum still had capacity for a while but there was no way we could ask her to decide something in the first half hour after she'd woken up. She was far too confused.

2. Mental capacity is about making an informed decision. That means understanding what is a healthy diet and the consequences of not following one. It means not following an obsessive diet but going through the whole process of taking in and understanding the facts, weighing those facts and communicating a decision. My son, Mike, doesn't understand a healthy diet. If you use the word diet at all in his presence, he'll think he's going to be starved. So the first thing he'll do is refuse to discuss a diet. My late mother in law was diabetic - very late onset, sometime in her mid-70s. She refused to follow a strict diet on the grounds that she was not going to benefit massively with lots of extra years by behaving and would rather enjoy her time. She died at 85, and still enjoyed her own choices in food. I had quite an argument with CQC over that one, but we won.

3. 90% of the disputes I've seen over mental capacity were around the weighing up of facts, especially in people with autism. Many people on the spectrum can handle the facts but will make their decision based on routine or obsession without considering the facts. Proving that one kept my sister safe in hospital for a few extra days.
This all of it. I have full mental capacity but I know lots of people who don’t. I’m always reminding people that capacity is fluid and a rigid test is not always the best technique in order to use for assessing it.