Helping for the homeless.

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120 posts
So did the man just want money????

I personaly think the way to deal with it all is to give sensible donations to charities which clearly support the homeless and misfortunate. They can distinguish between the 'truly misfortunate' and those who are just scamming etc.

Again, personally, I don't think begging on the streets should be allowed, and the Big Issue is also highly suspect - the beggar outside my supermarket is a BI 'seller'....but clearly she is just beging (very politely!) in a rich neighbourhood.

The foreign 'professional beggers' (who come to the Uk specifically to beg) must think we are complete cretins.

(Sadly, even giving to 'proper' charities isn't foolproof either - not just because so many of them pay their CEOs a fortune - see the latest 'name and shame' that is the CEO of Refuge, who gets, I think, if I remember rightly, around two hundred thousand punds a year ...AND gives jobs to her family AND bullies staff into tears....incredible!), but also because many of them waste the money - I had one a few years ago, a begging letter for young homeless teenagers, that quoted hundreds of pounds 'per person' to 'set them up' with 'the essentials'....they quoted prices like 'fifty pounds for a duvet'....WWWWWHHHHTTTTT?????? I can get a duvet in Tesco for a tenner for heaven's sake! Insane. I now doubt all charities alas.....so wretched, as I WANT to give, and do give, but do NOT want my money 'wasted' or bloating the CEO ...and nor do I want it going on 'political' causes like some of the children's charities ...one of them begged for funds to fight deportation or whatever for migrant children...sorry, that is POLITICAL. If I want to donate to politics I donate to the political party, not a charity!)
Yep ... when it comes to giving to charities , apply the " Trussells Test " ... a VERY simple one.

A can of beans ... foodbank recipient receives a can of beans.

Most other charities ?

Only a half or even less ... once salaries and expenses have been " Creamed off. "

London marathon ... 26 miles worth ... plenty of " Charity " t shirts on display.

How many realise that the first 10 / 11 / 12 miles were to pay for the those charities' executives' salaries ????????????

Food for thought ... no pun intended !
Pet66 wrote:
Sat Jan 12, 2019 6:39 pm
My grandson walked past a homeless man. Firstly he said no to giving something. Then had a guilt kick, went back to him with a sausage roll and can of pepsi. The thanks were, I don't like sausage rolls and not keen on pepsi!! He did accept the drink though. Grandsons reaction was never again. DD has suggested he doesn't let the incident make him uncaring which he agrees with. She said IF he wants to another time, maybe a warm drink and even a cookie may be more help. It is very difficult in Birmingham city centre, because,so many and some, not all are not homeless. Very sad,and very conscious stabbing for those of us who do care about them.
In a similar way with the old fella, when I was in the store I had a pang of guilt that I might buy him the wrong thing if he was diabetic or didn't eat meat. I just didn't know what to get him. So the bacon rolls seemed a good idea but I struggled with what drink? They are all full of sugar or diet fizzy pop. I looked at fruit smoothies and pop and plain water but settled on fresh orange juice. Probably I should have hot him a bottke of still water? But he was glad and he could probably have traded them later. But I did think what would I do if he rejected them?

I shook his hand and put my left hand on his shoulder as an expression of care and love towards him. His hands confirmed he was homeless. Poor old fella, I reckon he was too polite to ask for money.

But we don't know what hell they go through being on the streets. I am sorry about your experience and I hope you will not stop giving them food.
It's an emotive subject isn't it.
Some in Birmingham are obviously homeless. In shop doors trying to stay warm under damp sleeping bags, duvets coats etc. Not all beg, just sit there spaced out. I'm not going to judge as to why they are obviously addict's, and to be honest wouldn't approach them now. There is a group of workers who will go to them and chat, hopefully trying to help. Expect if I went later at night the genuine homeless would still be there? I haven't the courage to do that.
I never buy the big issue now, as I was nearly conned when working in the city. He asked me if I would buy his last big issue, then asked me if I really wanted to magazine!! Told him to give me my money back which he did. That's another pity, because it does help the genuine ones, and actually did have some interesting reads. The scammers spoil everything. There is help for homeless in Brum, but they have to have some money to stay. The salvation army for one. Of course some don't want to be helped or are very sadly past caring
I would add ... homeless / giving food ... most foodbanks would still have to observe the " Procedures " before deciding , on a practical level , whether to hand out food to a homeless person without the correct documentation.
Such is life in this Sad New World ... even the homeless come in categories.

Beggars ?

Where does one start ... professional or genuine ... even children in a pushchair as a prop ... at least three " Regulars " in Worksop High Street ( Or what now passes for the High Street ) ???
jenny lucas wrote:
Sat Jan 12, 2019 6:14 pm
It can be a real moral dilemma, I definitely agree. Do bear in mind that often we are asked not to give money to the 'apparently homeless'/'beggars' (and it is not just the state that asks us - outside Westminster Cathedral in Victoria is a notice asking the public NOT to give money to the beggars there)(as the cathedral organises handouts etc etc itself), because it will only go on drink/drugs or, or course, it is basically a scam (ie, it's simply a 'job' for the beggars)( I have a very nice Romanian begger lady outside my Waitrose....why she is there is beyond my comprehsnion - ie, why she is ALLOWED to be there.....)

All that said, I tend to assume that 'an old man' such as you describe Colin really IS 'in trouble' and simply because of their age are unlikely to be a 'fake'.

I also agree that giving food is much better than giving money 'just in case' they are simply after their next fix etc.

I do tend to think that there is a distinct 'underclass' of those who are 'unsaveable' ....ie, they can't become citizens who play a normal part in the econmy - for various reasons, whether drugs/drink or most likely mental illness (and that can be interrelated with the drugs etc), and they are the ones we simply have to 'shelter' (literally and by providing a 'safe place' to live out their lives as happily as they can)
Thanks Jenny, I soon realised by the look in his eyes that he was no threat just very needy. He wasn't begging that was the truth of it. But I can see, I am gifted with sight for all sorts of things.
He was almost too polite to ask or want to beg. That might be because of my physical size and demeanor I suppose. But I could see his need in his eyes. That's the bit that tears me up. Unspoken words.

I see it like this. All of us are products of the system. Some of us fit well in the system and can work in it and some cannot or they fall off the system and cannot get back on again. The country is like some huge machine which produces spoil as part of its industrial process. These people are what the machine has thrown on the spoil heaps. I am just lucky to have made it this far. I've made my own stupid choices in my life and many others have too. I agree that those people need permanent care because they will never be able to perform in a job. But forcing them into work on the back of housing them is not going to help them or anyone else.

Caring involves compassion and empathy and those feelings have become so rare?

I befriended a homeless drug addict and I never gave him money, just food and drink. He did ask me once for some food very politely and very concerned I would be upset. So we went into Maccas and we both had food and we talked.
He was a 19 year old heroin addict and I don't think I've met many nicer young guys than he was. When I arrived in town I'd ride my motorcycle past the shop where he slept and if he was their on his pile of things, then I'd park my bike in the bike park and I'd get him some hot food and some hot coffee and take it to him. I didnt expect anything from from him, not even s grunt or a thank you. I just did it for him.
We often met at the same place in town and I would always talk to him and showed him respect. I treated him as a human being. That's all it takes.
He lived for another year or so before he died because he couldn't give up heroin. I already knew that was a probability when I first spoke to him.
But he will remember that I helped him and showed him care and respect and that I was his friend for a while.
Chris From The Gulag wrote:
Sat Jan 12, 2019 7:18 pm
Yep ... when it comes to giving to charities , apply the " Trussells Test " ... a VERY simple one.

A can of beans ... foodbank recipient receives a can of beans.

Most other charities ?

Only a half or even less ... once salaries and expenses have been " Creamed off. "

London marathon ... 26 miles worth ... plenty of " Charity " t shirts on display.

How many realise that the first 10 / 11 / 12 miles were to pay for the those charities' executives' salaries ????????????

Food for thought ... no pun intended !

Well yes, charities are an interesting business. After watching how some of the main charities invest their money in global arms companies to make a return on their money that really killed it for me to give money to the big charities.

Having said that we save all year for the national children's homes charity. We've done if for years and all of my partners family save too.
Now Action for Children ?

If so :
Tony Hawkhead, chief executive of Action for Children, had a total remuneration package of £184,322, including a salary of £150,000 .... 29 Aug 2017.
Chris, under the incoming IOT (Internet of things), everything must be tagged, measured, quantified, monitored and digitised. That's so the whole world can be "managed" by an AI. That's the plan, but thankfully I'll be long gone by then.
120 posts