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Birds in the garden - Page 3 - Carers UK Forum

Birds in the garden

Socialise and chat about other areas of your life
553 posts
Thanks for the leads Scally - I will check those birds out in my ID book/RSPB website and see if I can figure it out precisely.
Mad's I have blown your pic up as best as I could and it look's very much like a
Sparrow hawk if I'm not mistaken and the Oh said that as well its not an owl or a harrier
Image
Thanks for the leads Scally - I will check those birds out in my ID book/RSPB website and see if I can figure it out precisely.
Mad's I have blown your pic up as best as I could and it look's very much like a
Sparrow hawk if I'm not mistaken and the Oh said that as well its not an owl or a harrier
Image
Definitely not a sparrow hawk, Bodger. Too big, for one thing. Yes, Sparrow hawks have bars on the tail too, but they don't have that distinctive white rump.
While my initial thought was sparrowhawk, before thinking owl - it didn't look 'quite the same' as the sparrowhawks that i have seen in the yard before. I have been viewing online images of Scally's three suggestions - and still cannot figure out what exactly it is...other than interesting! The RSPB site used to have a forum where you could post a picture for ID - but I see the site has been overhauled and can no longer find the forum!
Can I enter the fray and say I think the picture looks like a young sparrowhawk which are much more white underneath than the adults. I found a picture of a sparrowhawk that looks very similar http://www.camnest.co.uk/garden/previous.shtml and scroll down
Good picture: yes, that's a pretty good likeness and has the barred tail and white rump, so it has to be a runner. It's well accepted that these do look similar, so size is crucial. No guarantee that the website is correct, of course, there are lots of errors on the net! The tail of a goshawk is rounded and shorter, the sparrowhawk is longer and square cut. Shows how difficult it can be, when there is so much variance of age, sex etc within a single species. A lot smaller than the others, so you would need to photo a ruler in the branches of the same tree to get the scale, I guess. But there are ten sparrowhawks for every one goshawk, so it is more likely to be correct, than not. And in terms of habitat, a sparrowhawk is far more likely to be seen near a garden than the other bigger birds, which are pretty shy, so I think that clinches it.
Great thread Scally ,
This is my favorite bird, love to see these appear.


I love Magpies too, know they are scavengers and can be pests too. I have 4 families
in my back , nesting in unused chimneys , had a pet one came up on
window, for bits of bread, called him silver. love watching them, a few of
the neighbors cats are quite afraid of them .
Minnie
Here's another favourite of mine. The male is on the right.

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That is an interesting website, Crocus! My only problem is - the mystery bird in my photo was slightly larger than the adult sparrowhawks that have previously been seen in the yard - that is why I initially ruled that option out. It also stood more erect than horizontal... which is why my next conclusion was that it must be some sort of owl. Maybe it JUST puffed up due to the rainy weather and when perched in shelter they sit erect, or maybe a sparrowhawk interbred with a larger similar species? (I wish I knew as much about British birds as I did those of the Illawarra!) So far I know that we have sparrowhawks in the area - and buzzards of some sort not too far away - as in within 2 miles.
Ah yes, robins, magpies, green-finches - I have learned to spot them. Image
Today has been wet n windy, so only the wood pigeons, sparrows blackbirds and starlings have been hanging out whenever I have peeped. There are two wood pigeons sitting on the same tree as the mystery bird right now... sitting down sheltering from the rain, resting...
Here's a flock of waxwings that come sometimes in winter, raiding the rowan tree usually. Pinkish-gray birds, with a very distinctive crest: a real treat: watch out for them.

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553 posts