todays question ????

Discuss news stories and political issues that affect carers.
who said this week "we have all the universal benefits in our sights " "and other bnefits could also be means tested " when asked what other benefits were in their sights he replied "all benefits " thank god i no longer rely on the carers allowance for my main income as i now have new pensions which have been a struggle to pay for but now i get the benefit - haha ...without the carers allowance many would think twice about giving up work to care £232 per month aint a lot but it helps ........
As I have pointed out elsewhere, should you wish to claim CA and also work, it is perfectly possible to have your cake and eat it too, as long as you stash some of your excess earnings away into a pension plan and/or spend some of the rest on respite costs, in order to keep the remaining earnings below the threshold for Carers Allowance.
There is no longer a good reason to give up work to care, most carers are far better off
a) negotiating a package of support from their local authority and/or
b) paying someone else to provide the care and keeping their job.

Which proves what I have said all along: quitting work to care full time (for many people of working age who have some willingness to work and are healthy) is often a result of poorly informed, rash and emotionally-charged decision-taking, not an absolute necessity. And you may now throw all the cabbages at me you like, but I do speak from 22 years front-line experience as a working carer: last year I stashed more away into my pension plan than I actually drew as earned income, and that is not in some fancy professional career, that is working door to door on commission, for maybe 18 hrs a week, whilst I can get respite because my boy is at college or his sheltered work placement, or Mrs Scally is able to back me up Image

I must also add that a problem shared is a problem halved: the best form of social insurance any carer can have is a spouse: if you havent got one then the lonely hearts pages are a good place to start: it is never too late, it doesnt even matter if you are middle-aged, bald, fat and ugly: because there is always someone even more desperate than you to find a partner for life ..

Sadly I have to pay 20% income tax on my CA, and the government ultimately gets all the rest back in fuel duties and VAT: it is all swings and roundabouts, so, well ain't life a bitch, the only things that are truly certain are taxes and death - so in the meantime we might as well rock on to the crazy beat! Image Image Image
As I have pointed out elsewhere, should you wish to claim CA and also work, it is perfectly possible to have your cake and eat it too, as long as you stash some of your excess earnings away into a pension plan and/or spend some of the rest on respite costs, in order to keep the remaining earnings below the threshold for Carers Allowance.
There is no longer a good reason to give up work to care, most carers are far better off
a) negotiating a package of support from their local authority and/or
b) paying someone else to provide the care and keeping their job.

Which proves what I have said all along: quitting work to care full time (for many people of working age who have some willingness to work and are healthy) is often a result of poorly informed, rash and emotionally-charged decision-taking, not an absolute necessity. And you may now throw all the cabbages at me you like, but I do speak from 22 years front-line experience as a working carer: last year I stashed more away into my pension plan than I actually drew as earned income, and that is not in some fancy professional career, that is working door to door on commission, for less than 18 hrs a week Image
I'm not throwing cabbages..this time anyway. Image

I do find this fascinating and now that I can look at things from the other side so to speak (no longer hands on carer for my daughter) I really am interested to know how you do this.

Any chance you could give me some examples of how this could be done..a breakdown of how to go about things so to speak?

When local authorities say there is no money or they can only provide certain support, how can you get around that obstacle..how to "negotiate" of they won't budge? Same with paying someone else to provide care- how do you go about that?

What if the caree has medical needs, treatments or injections to be carried out etc. How would it be possible to negotiate a package with local authority if there are some medical needs too?

Genuine questions Scally, I am not taking the Michael. One never knows what the future might bring and I would like to be forewarned if I find myself in that position again.

At this point because of what I am asking you to explain to me, I have to bring a personal element into it, no choice really. Let's say for some reason my daugher had to return home. I know you would say thaty I should just refuse and you have got a point...actually, lets go back to before she left, makes things easier.

Daughter is booted out of college so is at home. Behaviour is a massive issue so it is unlikely that having a PA would be a viable option, she refused many times to go out with her careworker once weekly. Is on insulin 3 times daily plus other meds and another injectable med. She can be aggressive with others and has shown that she can be unpredictable.

How would I go about negotiating a package for her so I could return to work?

Is it possible to do this? I wish I had been able to get back to work but genuinely could not see a way through the mire and I have to add, neither could the health and social work teams we were in contact with.

I have time on my side now so would like to learn more about the points that you have raised often, to see how this could be done practically would be a great help.

Ta.
PS. Apologies for typing errors, it's been a long day and I am not too well.

PPS. Have just seen you have added more, so need to go read it and then see if I need to edit my reply. Image Image

PPPS. Nope..questions still stand. Image
Scally you have got to be kidding "...there is no longer a good reason to give up work to care.." Really? My husband collapsed and ended up with a heart pacemaker because of working and caring - he could have died. The stress was horrendous.

A pretty good reason to give up work wouldn't you say or do you just expect us to put our son into an old persons home which we have been told by the head of the SW dept himself is the only other available option? It is not just an idle threat either - it has happened to at least 3 of his friends.

Would you do that to your son if you had to so that you could continue working? And live with the knowledge that you have done that quite happily? How do we "negotiate" there then where a council won't budge, where the local MP and MSP and indeed Alex Salmond have all been contacted and can do nothing?

Where Alex Salmond writes me a letter saying that the Scottish Government "..have no plans to do anything for this cohort". My son and his friends are human beings they are not a "cohort" of aliens or something. If we could relocate to Denmark where the DMD care is excellent I would but its not exactly practical for us all to do that now is it?

In some cases it takes two people to care for the disabled person even though only one lot of carers allowance can be claimed. Please try and have a bit of understanding of those people who have a more intensive caring role than you do and who don't get the support which you claim to get.

As for paying someone to do the care while you work - what if the level of care is so intensive (like my son) that the costs are prohibitive (the reason why social work won't give us more help). You could find yourself in the position of working just to pay for the care!!! Or even out of pocket!

Eun
I worked for 3/4 years and cared and it cant be done safely ...
we have asked for help from local authority and unless we pay they can not provide anythng at all we even paid for all of our disability aids except for a few grab rails near the end of STANS life we recieved a hoist and tilting bed FREE.. we looked at care homes and did not find a single one suitable ..no way would we pay someone else to care 24/7 within our home ..you dont have much respect for woman if you believe you should get married just to have a live in carer and a shoulder to cry on...
scally talking crap ,no change there .i really think he should be a paid adviser to the dwp .
david c Image Image Image As is said so many times on this forum by moderators: only speak for yourself, you don't know everybody else's set of circumstances. There is a massive difference between being disabled and being disabled and ill - if you know what I mean.
I couldn't work and care. I had to give up my career.We did not have family lining up to support us.My mother would help out if my husband was too ill to look after the children, but she did not believe a wife should have to go out to work, so would not help out just for me to work.We did have some good friends who would help out,the best of these was a friends of my husband's,a young man who would take the children to the beach, they would go on the train or the bus,but he could only do it when he was not working himself. He was the ONLY person who would take all three of my children together, because everyone was nervous of my younger son's diabetes needs, or my elder son(with Downs Syndrome but not diabetic at the time),who would run off at any opportunity and had no awareness of safety.
Other friends and family just used to say,"oh she copes so well,she manages to work and look after the children;birthday parties with entertainment and all food home-made, I don't know how she does it."She did it by not sleeping, by wearing herself out,by decorating birthday cakes at 8am on returning from a night shift,but wanting to ensure that her children had as good a childhood as she could d*m well give them. One friend whose children were similiar age, but who was a Carer for her Mum,was a wonderful friend, still is.We helped each other out as often as we could.
I still had to give up paid employment.
Looking back on my life, I would not do it again.I know everyone's situation is different, but I have seen many Carers on their knees with exhaustion.
When my younger son was ill, I kept asking for support, but kept being ignored or being told there was no help available, even my MP could not get support for my family. If the support I had asked for had been available, then my son might still be alive today.I will always feel bitter and angry that I asked, but the answer was always no.(the Health Ombudsman last week found our Health Board to have falsified documents on another patient who died suddenly in their care, due to Diabetes,a hypoglycaemic attack).
scally talking crap ,no change there .i really think he should be a paid adviser to the dwp .
You may not agree with Scally - Lord knows a lot of people don't, right or wrong - but please stop making the comments personal. Disagree with the content, not the personality.
Ok, suppose I want to go back to work, hubby needs care 24/7 after his stroke and now vascular dementia. He is, FACT, going to get worse probably sooner than later.

The jobs I have had have all been for minimum wage, at the time about £5.50p, carers cost minimum of £8 to £10 an hour then. Not sure what the minimum wage is now but I pay a support worker £13.50 an hour to take hubby fishing for 4 hours a month, that is all the outside care I can afford.

Scally, the maths do not add up. Me earning minimum wage and carers getting £13.50 an hour. If you have a genuinely helpful answer please let me know.

I have just asked for Direct Payments and been refused as they do not cover 'just' being a 'companion' to someone while I went to work.