Social Care Costs : Government & LA News / Plans / Actions

Discuss news stories and political issues that affect carers.
83 posts
Henrietta and those other few who are genuinely interested in the future of social care funding. If you have time, check out the all party Dilnot Report which was full of recommendations which were never fulfilled. Lots of current ideas are related to Dilnot ......many parts diluted etc etc.
Nobody wants to pay higher taxes. Everybody wants free care. I have no idea how to resolve it all!!! Private insurance is an option but hey, not many can afford it.
Just sayin' lol
Dilnot Report

Fairer Funding for All – The Commission’s Recommendations to Government

On 4 July 2011 the Commission reported to Government with its finding and recommendations for a new funding system.

The report highlighted that the current funding system is in urgent need of reform: it is hard to understand, often unfair and unsustainable. People are left exposed to potentially catastrophic care costs with no way to protect themselves.

Our recommendations set out how Government could dramatically improve the system and make it one we can be proud of. They include the following proposals:

Individuals’ lifetime contributions towards their social care costs – which are currently potentially unlimited – should be capped.

After the cap is reached, individuals would be eligible for full state support.

This cap should be between £25,000 and £50,000.

We consider that £35,000 is the most appropriate and fair figure

The means-tested threshold, above which people are liable for their full care costs, should be increased from £23,250 to £100,000

National eligibility criteria and portable assessments should be introduced to ensure greater consistency

All those who enter adulthood with a care and support need should be eligible for free state support immediately rather than being subjected to a means test.

The Commission estimates that its proposals – based on a cap of £35,000 – would cost the State around £1.7billion.

Andrew Dilnot, chair of the Commission, said:

The issue of funding for adult social care has been ignored for too long. We should be celebrating the fact we are living longer and that younger people with disabilities are leading more independent lives than ever before. But instead we talk about the ‘burden of ageing’ and individuals are living in fear, worrying about meeting their care costs.

“The current system is confusing, unfair and unsustainable. People can’t protect themselves against the risk of very high care costs and risk losing all their assets, including their house. This problem will only get worse if left as it is, with the most vulnerable in our society being the ones to suffer.

“Under our proposed system everybody who gets free support from the state now will continue to do so and everybody else would be better off. Putting a limit on the maximum lifetime costs people may face will allow them to plan ahead for how they wish to meet these costs. By protecting a larger amount of people’s assets they need no longer fear losing everything.
Thank you DancinintheRain- I must confess I had not heard of it before as I like many others, probably behaved like an Ostrich with its' head in the sand until the election highlighted proposals and also I have been paying enormous care bills for home care for 2 or 3 months, currently less substantial thank goodness.
Thank you Chris for pasting the details .
I have just had a reply on behalf of my MP, no surprises for guessing content, PM already listening and reviewing, Corbyn not fit to be PM etc. I got told as a self funder my dad would not be affected. Perhaps not if he were Rockerfella with hundreds of thousands stashed away but I suspect most self funders if fortunate enough to be in such a category are hovering not far over the threshold. Care bills of £1000 per week won't keep you self funding for long.
I have compiled a polite but I think well framed argument back explaining that potential loss of upto £230,000 (cost of housing less £100K on the South coast) is not that insignificant and yes I was being partially selfish writing for myself and not on behalf of my father - lets face it and be blunt, towards the end of his life, with advanced dementia he is not loosing too much sleep over care bills and manifestos.
I took pains to explain that carers were by and large too busy, too tired and too broke to shout that loudly but on this occasion I felt the need to get involved. I also added that without a cap being anounced prior to June 8th I would be unable to make an informed decision and would resort to one of the other candidates.
I would urge anyone reading to get their head around the proposals and make some noise to your Conservative candidate. I only hope the silence and apathy on this forum is due to everyone voicing their concerns elsewhere.
Perhaps the biggest failing of the Dilnot Report was not to extend the terms of reference to include us ?

There again , only our supporting orgainsations know the answer to that one ... we were never asked !

Only 2 years earlier , the government of the day went out of their way to communicate with us directly !

Still , that was 2009 ... the blackest year for carers so far ... worth reading that separate thread if you are not acquainted with our history.

http://www.carersuk.org/forum/news-camp ... hope-29230


To understand today , one often has to look back at yesterday.
An extract from Frances Ryan's article in today's Guardian.

Classic case of to post or not to post given the uncertainty of the Government's proposals.

However , I leave that judgement to the reader given we are talking of our position :

The country is about to face a “staggering increase” in the cost of social care. Research published this week shows that within the next eight years there will be 2.8 million people over the age of 65 needing nursing and social care – that’s an increase of 25%. With no credible response, Theresa May’s team is lurching between silence and frantic underhand tactics. Yet what’s really damning is that as the “dementia tax” U-turn gets the focus, more black holes lurking in the Conservatives’ social care policy are going under the radar.

Take the unpaid leave plan. Before the dementia tax captured the headlines, May proudly announced that if she were re-elected, employees would be given the right to take a year off work to care for elderly relatives. The generosity is remarkable. The Tories will help destroy the social care safety net and then allow you unpaid time off to pick up the pieces.

Family carers have been the invisible backbone of social care for years, but to enshrine this policy in a manifesto marks a disturbing shift. The Conservatives don’t intend to relieve the pressure on carers but use unpaid labour as a long-term solution to “plug the gap” in gutted state funding.

If unpaid work isn’t enough, the dementia tax could then leave carers suddenly homeless when the person they are caring for dies. One woman, a carer for her elderly mother, broke down on the radio this week. She was describing how the policy appears to mean that – because she’s living in the family home to care for her mum – when her mum dies, their house will be sold off to pay the state back for her care, leaving her with nowhere to live.

It’s unclear whether a similar fate to that of carers who live with older relatives awaits disabled people who – largely due to a lack of accessible homes and adequate social care packages – live with their parents into later life. When their parents die, will the disabled child lose their home as well?

That this hasn’t even been mentioned by the Conservatives is hardly a surprise. While the dementia tax is criticised for failing to address the needs of older people, there is no plan at all for working-age disabled people who rely on social care.

As one reader with a chronic pain condition asked me this week: “Will the new social care policy apply to disabled people too? The media’s not talking about disabled folk.” I’ve written before about the way the social care debate shuts out disabled people but we’ve now reached a point where major policy that completely ignores us is being announced.


Scaremongering ?

No , a direct consequence for many IF the proposals are adopted for a future green paper.

######################################################

What is clear that both carers and our carees have been shut out of the decision making for far too long.

Not since 2009 have we , ourselves , been involved in consultations at the very least.

A good starting point will be in the autumn , when the new runners and riders are announced for the All Party Carers Group in the House.

Time for a direct liaison with them , me thinks. After all , they will be our mps , and " Carers " is their chosen speciality. That's what it will say on the tin .... ?

In CarerLand and CareeLand , WHO speaks for us .... ?
Chris From The Gulag wrote:An extract from Frances Ryan's article in today's Guardian.

Classic case of to post or not to post given the uncertainty of the Government's proposals.

However , I leave that judgement to the reader given we are talking of our position :
The country is about to face a “staggering increase” in the cost of social care. Research published this week shows that within the next eight years there will be 2.8 million people over the age of 65 needing nursing and social care – that’s an increase of 25%. With no credible response, Theresa May’s team is lurching between silence and frantic underhand tactics. Yet what’s really damning is that as the “dementia tax” U-turn gets the focus, more black holes lurking in the Conservatives’ social care policy are going under the radar.

Take the unpaid leave plan. Before the dementia tax captured the headlines, May proudly announced that if she were re-elected, employees would be given the right to take a year off work to care for elderly relatives. The generosity is remarkable. The Tories will help destroy the social care safety net and then allow you unpaid time off to pick up the pieces.

Family carers have been the invisible backbone of social care for years, but to enshrine this policy in a manifesto marks a disturbing shift. The Conservatives don’t intend to relieve the pressure on carers but use unpaid labour as a long-term solution to “plug the gap” in gutted state funding.

If unpaid work isn’t enough, the dementia tax could then leave carers suddenly homeless when the person they are caring for dies. One woman, a carer for her elderly mother, broke down on the radio this week. She was describing how the policy appears to mean that – because she’s living in the family home to care for her mum – when her mum dies, their house will be sold off to pay the state back for her care, leaving her with nowhere to live.

It’s unclear whether a similar fate to that of carers who live with older relatives awaits disabled people who – largely due to a lack of accessible homes and adequate social care packages – live with their parents into later life. When their parents die, will the disabled child lose their home as well?

That this hasn’t even been mentioned by the Conservatives is hardly a surprise. While the dementia tax is criticised for failing to address the needs of older people, there is no plan at all for working-age disabled people who rely on social care.

As one reader with a chronic pain condition asked me this week: “Will the new social care policy apply to disabled people too? The media’s not talking about disabled folk.” I’ve written before about the way the social care debate shuts out disabled people but we’ve now reached a point where major policy that completely ignores us is being announced.


Here's the whole news item for anyone wanting to read it. I totally understand the fear of being made homeless once my caring role is over. :(
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfr ... led-people
A first ... so far !

Council Tax raised to fund Social Care and STILL severe cuts !

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-la ... e-41188238

A local authority plans to make £5.5m of cuts to adult social care despite receiving additional funds for those services from council tax payers.

Lancashire County Council (LCC) was among a number of authorities that decided to add a 2% precept ring-fenced for the sector. This has raised £8m.

The government allowed councils to add the precept in 2015 after complaints the sector was facing a funding crisis.

But LCC said it "did not raise enough" as it plans £45m in further cuts.


Madness !

Funding social care through Council Tax .... many who don't earn enough to pay Income tax still have to pay the full amount .... in my manor , Bassetlaw , this is causing real problems as in many other low wage areas !

Council Tax is based on property values ... a family earning £ 10,000 pa pays the same as their next door neighbours earning £ 30 / 40,000 pa ... a flat rate tax . not progressive !

Goes back almost a decade ... CarerWatch threads galore at the time ... funding social care needs to be done through general taxation , not local !!!

Like 2004 , and the first wave of LA cutbacks ... if Lancashire get away with this , whose next ?
More on the Government's proposal to cap ( Or not to cap ) care fees :

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/money/consum ... fees-2020/

Tories ditch plans to introduce cap on care fees by 2020.

Theresa May could yet abandon the Tories' promise of introducing a cap on care costs by 2020.

A cap was first suggested in 2011 in a bid to reassure families they would not face unlimited bills and would be able to pass on an inheritance to their descendants.

But the move has been dogged by controversy ever since.

David Cameron, the former prime minister, pledged a cap set at £72,000 by 2020.

Then this summer, the Conservatives unveiled new plans for sweeping care reform prior to this year's General Election that did not include a cap.

Following an intense public backlash over the so-called "dementia tax", the party quickly u-turned and promised it would include the option of an overall cap on care bills in a forthcoming consultation paper.

It is now reported that the paper will be published next summer - but that the Government has ruled out introducing a cap by 2020.

It is the latest in a series of delays and broken promises over the last six years.

At the moment care fees are only restricted by a lower threshold that means the state picks up the tab when assets are worth £23,500 or less. Property values are taken into account if the individual is in a care home, but not otherwise.

The Tories' pre-election plan involved raising the threshold to £100,000, and crucially would have included the value of property, irrespective of whether the patient received treatment where they lived or at a residential care home.

After the party's failure to increase its parliamentary majority, the future of the unpopular reforms remain unclear.

An ageing population living with long-term, debilitating diseases has put intense strain on Britain's care system, which sees mainly privately-owned homes take on a mixture of private and state-funded patients. Councils use their weight to negotiate lower fees, leaving "self funders" to subsidise care home costs.

The average total cost of a stay in a care home ranges from £92,000 to £50,000, depending on where the home is, recent figures show.

A spokesman for the Department of Health said the Government was "keen to hear different views on the cap including its level and design" as part of the consultation.

They could not say when the consultation would launch and would not confirm that a potential cap would only be introduced after 2020.
Timeline: how the care cap has been delayed again... and again

July 2011 - Andrew Dilnot heads an independent commission into how care should be funded. He recommends setting a cap at £35,000 and raising the asset threshold under with the state pays costs to £100,000. David Cameron agrees to the concept of a cap but not until after the 2015 election.

Jan 2013 - The Coalition government plans a cap set at £75,000.

July 2015 - Following the Tories' election victory, the party says the cap - now at £72,000 - would only be introduced in 2020.

May 2017 - Theresa May sets out plans to scrap the cap as part of broader care reform.

May 2017 - Mrs May backs down following public outcry and promises to include the cap in an upcoming consultation on the plans.

October 2017 - Tories ditch pledge to cap care fees by 2020. It is unclear when, or if, a cap will be introduced at all.


Could have been posted under the SMOKE & MIRRORS thread but , after tossing the proverbial coin , this thread won !

Colour coding to make it easy to read will follow after someone fills up the INK bottle ... now day 5 ....
I can't see this being a reality, especially when the population is "top heavy". It would affect me a great deal, as my little cottage that cost £16,700 in 1976, has gone up many times in value in the last few years. Since every house in the New Forest is worth over £100,000, it would have huge implications.
Ultimately, what would be the point of trying to save or buy a house? It could end up with people remortgaging their houses and going on a spending spree just to avoid future care fees. I could have one hell of a party if I did this, BUT it's the only home my sons have ever known.
My husband was a hard working mechanic, had he now worked so very hard we would never have been able to afford a house of our own, and we went without a lot of luxuries as a result. It is morally wrong to penalise people who are prudent and have chosen to buy a home rather than go to the pub, have meals out, and go on foreign holidays.
The Government are in a political dilema.

Not to cap care fees goes against traditional policy enacted by this Party over the past two centuries ... the preservation of wealth and power for the few as opposed to spreading said wealth more evenly.

Therein lies the real dilema which flies in the face of human nature ... how to " Convince " someone who has spent a lifetime building his / her financial assets to let others , who have not made a real contribution to society , share that wealth.

The answer to that conundrum lies OUTSIDE this Forum !!!

As for " Social Care " , the problems and possible solutions transcend politics ... neither the tradition Right or Left have an answer which would be acceptable , and practical , in today's Sad New World.

In essence , and like the NHS , it will take the participation of all concerned within the sectors to arrive at a solution ... or at least something tangible ... to prevent actually meltdown.

With Social Care , our contribution has , occasionly , been acknowledged but .... have we EVER been invited to participate in any policy planning meetings wherein our contribution has been taken for granted ... as if we did not exist beyond being vital components of a disfunctional system ?

As for the immediate future , both the NHS and Social Care are like the SS Titantic ... many see the iceberg but , nobody on the bridge is taking any action .... full steam ahead and hope that it does not do too much damage ?

The answer lies , regretably , with our politicians ... they need to step outside traditional party politics , huddle together , and at least try to come up with some action before setting out a substainable plan.

The longer they flap about like headless childrens , the more the body / mind count will rise.
83 posts