Should care homes be monitored with hidden cameras

Discuss news stories and political issues that affect carers.
Adult and elderly people living in care homes could be under constant surveillance if proposals from the Care Quality Commission (CQC) are put into place. The CQC wants to use hidden cameras to help with inspections after a number of scandals.
http://www.itv.com/news/2013-10-15/shou ... n-cameras/

Hidden cameras and a team of pensioners acting undercover for the authorities could be to be sent into care homes to expose abuse and neglect, according to the new chief care inspector.


Annual inspections are to be scrapped and replaced and with a new “surveillance model” and a system of “intelligent monitoring” to decide where and when to carry out checks
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/ ... eeded.html

Members experiences of care homes will differ, some good and some possibly bad, some are to still face the decision about care homes in the times ahead. Therefore can we please be careful with comments in case some get worried too much and stick to the question..... Should care homes be monitored with hidden cameras?

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Not the best of ideas: there is no way to legally do this in some cases at least, and that would mean the most vulnerable (mainly those who could not choose) would be in a situation where if there is a camera they will display their intimate parts to the world, and if they don't they will be vulnerable to abuse.

So which is worse? Tough question. But I certainly wouldn't want to flash my bits around on the screen.
Me neither! I think that where there are good reasons for concern, that they should be an option available.
CQC are running "Listening Events" for each of the 18 NHS trusts that they are inspecting under their new model. Aim seems to be to talk about experiences, share feedback on how improvements can be made and find out more about how the new inspections will be carried out.

Opening the subject up for discussion, it seems.

Oh, my view on hidden cameras? Currently I am totally against the idea for many reasons.
Anyone interested should Google CQC listening events, and you have to register your interest. Maybe I'm getting really cynical, but isn't this going to therefore only reach those "in the know" and the ordinary person who could be interested will be excluded, unaware of the events altogether?!?!
When it comes to cynicism in general - in comparison to me you are an amateur!

Actually, you CAN attend without registering beforehand, this fact is stated quite clearly.

The registration only takes a minute to do in any case, so I hope anybody seriously interested takes advantage.

And of course, as the CQS is hoping to widen the discussion anyone can also be PROACTIVE at any time. I see the fundamental problem is that in reality few people will actually involve themselves. So thanks to Rosemary for initiating the subject.

Whether the CQS will spend much on local advertising of dates and venues I have no idea. Budgets are always about prioritising. Be it the CQS, the NHS, CUK, or businesses.
Coincidentally, I received an email invite to an NHS presentation about the future of long term care, including Continuing Healthcare. It came from one of my son's service providers. As a long term carer with two carees, one 34 with SLD, one physically frail 86 year old, I have all sorts of links with various care and disability services in my area, so how come I haven't been inundated with email invites? The County Council have details of all adult service users, and the majority of their carers. In the days before computers, it was time consuming and costly to get in touch with people, but now it's relatively quick and easy. I hope very much that CQC will use these opportunities to get in touch with everyone, not just people on forums like this.
I do not think I can answer why you personally have not been inundated with personal invitations despite your caring credentials. Image

CQC in general - just like other organisations including CUK does indeed use technology to reach a public audience including twitter and Facebook presence.
CQC must be rather pleased at the current media coverage. Usually, media coverage occurs when they have failed. Which is far too frequently.

However, it is all we currently have in place so working with it is the best option.
I haven't bothered with the articles because I have an ear infection and can't hear them at all right now.

I like the idea of undercover pensioners... however, I have concerns with the hidden cameras.

While I think that they could be good in the sense that they could catch abuse as it occurs, I'm concerned about just what they would be recording. A lot of personal care takes place within a resident's room - and sometimes that will include toileting for one reason or another. Even our shops aren't allowed to put CCTV cameras in toilets and dressing rooms for reasons of decency - so why should we allow it to happen to our elderly?

It's also worth looking at just who would have access to such intimate footage, too because it opens up the possibility for even more abuse of the elderly and disabled - no one would like to see footage of themselves changing uploaded to the internet, so why should we open up our elderly to that possibility?
Thinking about it now, I feel full time cameras should not be used unless there is some suspicion of bad treatment. I would not like to have my every movement recorded and viewed by others but if there was the slightest doubt regarding standards of care or misconduct then bring in the cameras.