Food / Energy / Clothing Banks : MORE A HUMANITARIAN THREAD ? 100,000+ Carers Reported As Needing Them In 2018

Discuss news stories and political issues that affect carers.
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Even the legendary FT is now jumping on the bandwagon ... from their series on inequality :


Food banks tackle problems at the roots of poverty.

Centres offer additional support to address clients’ underlying difficulties.




When users of a food bank in Gateshead in north-east England collected their emergency food parcels on Friday, the tinned and dried foods were augmented by a packet of freshly grown sage, rosemary and mint. This Friday, for the first time, they will also receive a potted basil plant.

Tended by the congregation at Trinity Methodist church in Blaydon, where the food bank is held, the herb garden has been developed with support from the Royal Horticultural Society.

Best known for the annual Chelsea Flower Show, the Blaydon project is the first time the RHS, through its four-year-old Greening Great Britain scheme, has supported a food bank.

It typifies a trend among the UK’s 2,000 charitably funded food bank outlets, which offer emergency food and support to people struggling financially. As demand for their food parcels has reached record levels, they are increasingly offering additional support to address clients’ underlying difficulties.

“It’s about inspiring change in people to be healthier and happier,” said Christine Wright, the RHS community outreach adviser who worked on the Blaydon garden’s development. She added that food bank users would be encouraged to volunteer in the garden.

Across the country, food banks now provide services such as budgeting and debt advice, help in switching utility providers and cookery sessions, alongside offers of school uniforms, furniture and books.

“Food banks are no longer a temporary solution for many people experiencing hardship. They are now an established part of the welfare landscape,” said Claire Thompson, assistant professor at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.


Growing food is a new trend. Smethwick food bank in the West Midlands has started an allotment and “pay as you feel” café; Strabane in Northern Ireland is setting up an allotment, vegetarian cookery course and a café.

Newcastle’s West End food bank has this year installed six raised beds at its Benwell premises. They are now bursting with courgettes, lettuces and beetroot, as are big pots with runner beans and crates with strawberries. The produce is used for the lunches the food bank serves to clients.

This is not only about access to fresh food, said John McCorry, the food bank’s chief executive. It offers clients a quiet space, benefiting mental and physical health. “It’s more about engaging the clients in mindfulness and wellbeing.”

“We see an evolution in a sense — food banks are trying to find other ways to help people,” he said. “It’s about enabling resilience, to enable people to move beyond food banks.” Summer activities this year included plug-wiring.

In Scotland, the West Lothian food bank will launch sewing sessions this autumn so that clients can alter clothing and gain skills that might help them gain work. When a client had a job interview but no suitable clothing, the charity shop run by the food bank runs found him a pair of trousers and hemmed them to fit. “We’ve never seen that guy since,” said general manager Kathleen Neilly. “It changed his life.”

Food banks date back about 20 years but government austerity since 2010 and the introduction of universal credit, with its five-week wait for new claims, have accelerated their use. This Wednesday’s government spending round announcement by chancellor Sajid Javid will be watched for any changes to universal credit.

The Trussell Trust, a national umbrella group that represents 428 food banks in the UK operating out of 1,200 centres, said that in the year to April its network provided 1,583,668 emergency food parcels; 577,618 recipients were children. Food bank users must be referred by a doctor, social worker, health visitor or other care worker.

Trussell Trust data show 126 of its food banks now have professional debt or money advisers, 50 offer IT facilities including job searching and 19 provide mental health services.


“Food banks are set up to deal with an emergency situation but a significant proportion of the people coming to us are in a chronic financial situation,” said Craig Crosthwaite, co-ordinator of the North Ayrshire food bank in Scotland, which grows food and encourages clients to take it. Gig economy work such as zero-hours contracts and single parenthood are among the factors contributing to people’s inadequate access to money, he said.

The standard food-bank emergency parcel, with its set items, exemplifies the problem of lack of choice, Mr Crosthwaite said. “Food banks to some extent create dependency. There’s no personal development in that.” Choice, he said, provided dignity. An element of control supported mental health and a sense of self-worth.

At Axminster food bank in rural Devon, while fresh produce is close to hand — there are “community fridges” in the countryside offering free surplus food — transport issues loom large.

But here too, low morale and poor mental health are common problems. Heavy redundancies from Axminster Carpets in 2013 affected many older people who had never worked elsewhere. Food-bank clients can access six free complementary therapy sessions, such as acupuncture, reflexology and physiotherapy, at the associated health and wellbeing centre.

“The food is quite easily resolved,” said food bank and wellbeing centre manager Aynsley Jones. “It’s the other issues that are not.”

Food banks increasing in schools for pupils' families.

More schools in England are setting up food banks to help feed their pupils' families, according to the biggest school governors' organisation.


The National Governance Association's annual survey found 8% of governors were in schools which had food banks - up from 7% last year.

The highest proportion were in the north east - where 13% of governors were in schools with a food bank.

Heads' leader Geoff Barton said schools faced "rising levels of poverty".

"It is a shameful situation in a country which is among the wealthiest in the world," said Mr Barton, leader of the ASCL head teachers' union.

Washing uniforms

The National Governance Association (NGA) surveyed 6,000 governors about the challenges facing their schools.

School governors, who are often volunteers such as parents or representatives of the local community, warned that funding shortages and teacher recruitment were among the biggest problems.

But the survey also showed the rising challenge of having to offer welfare services to families - such as running food banks, offering meals outside of term time and washing pupils' clothes and uniforms.

Food banks, which provide emergency supplies of food, were most common in schools in the north east of England, the west midlands and London - and were more likely in nursery and primary schools than in secondary.


Among nursery school governors, 2% reported that their schools were providing emergency loans to parents.

Welfare services

"There is an increasing demand on schools to take responsibility for more areas of children's lives than simply their education," said NGA chief executive, Emma Knights.

"School staff have an increased burden of providing welfare services because of chronic underfunding in other areas and particularly cuts to local authority services," said Ms Knights.

But relying on schools for welfare services was "not a satisfactory solution", she said.

Head teachers have been warning about the growing pressure on schools to provide much more than academic support.

In a survey of more than 400 schools earlier this year, the Association of School and College Leaders found 43% of schools were offering families help with food.

These were not necessarily running regular food banks, but included schools providing food parcels on a more occasional basis.

Head teachers' leader, Mr Barton, said schools were becoming a "fourth emergency service providing clothing, food and pastoral support to many young people in extremely difficult circumstances".


"These pupils would not be ready to learn without this support," he said.
Ground zero ... Rhyl , North Wales ... and " They " are multiplying :

Rhyl now has more food banks than supermarkets as families are pushed further into poverty.

A fourth food bank has been launched because of increasing demand in the town.


Rhyl now has more food banks than supermarkets as a fourth is launched to cope with the number of impoverished families living in the town.

Changes or delays to benefits and the increased cost of living are the main reasons why people are struggling to put food on the table.

Many are having to turn to food banks in order to survive, but increasingly stocks are being stripped bare.

But the Trussell Trust has now launched a fourth food bank in the town which is set to open next Tuesday, September 10.

It will run from Sussex Street Christian Centre and operate alongside three others in the area, which include The King's Storehouse , Foryd Community Centre and the ASK Centre.

Rachel Round is heading up the Trussell Trust project and said that despite the ongoing regeneration in Rhyl, there are still many families going hungry.

She said: "As Christians we recognise that we have a duty to care for those who find themselves in need of help and support.

"That help will be available to everyone irrespective of their beliefs or non-beliefs.

"We recognise that ending hunger is about more than food.

"We will provide compassionate, practical support to people in crisis in order to tackle the root causes that lock them into poverty and build people’s resilience so they are less likely to need a food bank in the future.

"Where requested we will refer those in need of help to other partner agencies who can help with specific issues."

he Trussell Trust has more than 1,200 food bank centres across their UK network and help provide a minimum of three days' nutritionally-balanced emergency food to people who have been referred in crisis.

Earlier this year, North Wales Live reported how The King's Storehouse stocks had been "hammered" by people struggling to live off Universal Credit, with some having to wait as long as eight weeks for money under the controversial benefit reform.

Several times, volunteers had to issue urgent appeals for help after shelves were depleted by demand.

One volunteer described the situations people are living in as "scary" adding "people are basically being left to rot".

One was an elderly lady whose husband died without leaving a will, forcing her to turn to the food bank because she couldn't access his bank account.

Last year, the food bank, which is an arm of the Wellspring Christian Centre, had to put a block on “relentless” referrals because they were "run ragged."

Food bank use nationally has seen a steep rise with Universal Credit being blamed.


The new benefit combines six existing benefits and the government says it is aimed at "helping people into work" and simplifying the old system.

It's been the subject of huge controversy, with delays in claimants receiving money well documented.

But the Department for Work and Pensions say Universal Credit is a "force for good" and replaces a "rigid and constrictive system, which deterred people taking up work opportunities."

They say their research shows that many people join UC with pre-existing arrears, but that number falls by a third after four months.

The reasons for people using food banks are "complex," and it would be wrong to link a rise to any one cause, they said.

Vale of Clwyd MP, Chris Ruane said: "We are lucky here in the Vale of Clwyd that we have strong, committed network of volunteers across the constituency who are prepared to give their time and donations to ensure that children, families and individuals are not going hungry.

“However, the increase in the number of food banks and the increase in the number of people using them – many of those are actually in work – is a damning indictment of the Conservative government’s austerity programme over the past nine years.

“They should be ashamed of themselves for this, they should be ashamed of the massive increase in the ever growing number of people who we see sleeping on the streets or in temporary housing due to the intentional delays put into the Universal Credit system.

“There are too many people who are having to walk a financial tightrope, living from day-to-day and not having the means to cope when there is a fall in their income and so having to rely on food banks.

“The government should be listening to those who run food banks, advice organisations, local authorities and others who have consistently pointed out the failings in the system and address these as a priority.”
It's National food bank day ... in Nothampton.

Plenty of photos for the curious amongst our ranks :

https://www.northamptonchron.co.uk/news ... -1-9061335



National Food Bank Day: Make a small change and fight food poverty in Northampton.

On National Food Bank Day 2019, Northampton's food banks are in greater need than ever...



Food banks feed thousands of people in Northampton every year. In February, Emmanuel Church in Weston Fevell reported they fed over 3,000 people in 2018.

Often, people are pointed to food banks by agencies when they are in dire need. Some have not eaten for days; others will feed their children first and go hungry themselves.

The need for rapidly rising across the town. Town centre charity Re:Store, based at the Central Vineyard building in Sheep Street, referrals for people accessing the food bank has shot up by 40 per cent in the space of a year.

In fact, the charity hit an all-time high in July when 286 people where referred them for emergency help.

Re:Store funding Manager Alex Turtle said: "I think the need for food banks has grown because people are more aware of them and we've shaken off some of the stigmas around them.

"But the situation we've found ourselves in nationally has led to people coming to food banks, such as precarious employment through zero-hour contracts or rent problems.

"That and universal credit was introduced in Northampton last year, and that caused some teething problems that affected many people."

But Re:Store isn't the only food bank in town. Dozens of churches and charities like Emmanuel Church in Weston Favell or the Hope Centre work to offer emergency food to people in need - and all of them rely on public donations.

For National Food Bank Day, make a small change and think about how to help your nearest charity during your next weekly shop.
Re:Store has published a list of common essentials on their website to print out and keep in mind during food shops.

View the list here:
https://www.restorenorthampton.org.uk/ ... -bank.html

If you are in need of support, a list of agencies who can refer you to a food bank can be found here:

https://www.restorenorthampton.org.uk/agencies.html
Ground zero ... Saffron Walden , Essex ... a true blue commuter manor with astronomically priced housing.

Inside the food bank in " The best place to live in the UK " - where children are starving and people are in crisis.

Despite its wealthy surroundings, the Uttlesford food bank is still struggling to cope with the impact of Universal Credit.


Image

While MPs harangued each other over Brexit a young mother walked in to a nondescript building in wealthy Saffron Walden with a baby crying with hunger, desperate for help so she could feed it.

Even for staff at the Uttlesford food bank office in Shire Hill, this was a “shocker of a day”.

While many see Saffron Walden and the wider Uttlesford area as one of the wealthiest parts of the UK – it is regularly named as among the best places to live in the UK – there is a hidden underbelly, says Uttlesford food bank manager Sophie Durlacher.

And the problem of people falling into desperate poverty – she says that is largely down to the impact of Universal Credit – is getting worse.

“We shouldn’t have mothers spending the last day of the school holidays at the benefits office arguing against a reduction in their universal credit then the afternoon at the food bank,” she said.

“We also had a client in with severe mental health issues who was so hungry we had to feed him then and there.”

“Whilst Brexit is occupying the country’s emotional and political energy the most vulnerable are starving in front of our eyes,” the food bank shouted from its social media page on the day MPs voted to delay Brexit.

Sophie added: “One of the babies we had in was crying with hunger. They were so hungry they didn’t stop crying.

“I just took the baby away and fed the baby and got the baby sorted because the mother was just beside herself.

“Last Wednesday was a bit of a shocker of a day.”

Uttlesford food bank staff say they are seeing an increase in the number of people using the service of about 50 per cent year on year.

While in 2018 they served 998 people, they are on target to serve 1,500 people this year.

Sophie added: “The reasons that people come to us are incredibly varied. Universal Credit has had a big impact.

“It was rolled out in Uttlesford in November 2017 so quite early on. We don’t have a social security office.

“You have to go to Braintree or Cambridge to get your claim looked at.

“And people have just been left high and dry. The money doesn’t go as far as they need it to.

“But we have a stark number of clients who are in work as well – often on zero hours contracts and often we have young mothers.

“They may well be single mothers – not always.

“But they may have been the main breadwinner and they might not then have any income since they stopped working.

“There are as many reasons as there are people who walk through the door.

“But it’s the pretty punitive benefits system and low incomes and the really high cost of living that is getting people into these situations.”

She added: “Everywhere has a degree of a problem but we are no way the biggest food bank in the country – we are probably one of the smallest but that doesn’t make any difference to our clients.

“When that client walks through the door – that client is in need.”

The foodbank does cover a large area encompassing Saffron Walden, Dunmow, Takeley, Thaxted and as far north as Great Chesterford on the Cambridgeshire border.

She added: “The way we judge it is that every year we start to run low on stock over the summer because we get a lot at harvest and Christmas and that carries you through.

“Last year we started to run low at the end of July and this year we started to run low in May.

“We have been able to stock up since but the increase in need has been really noticeable.”

She added: “If you are struggling in somewhere like Uttlesford it is difficult because there is no narrative and if you are the only person who is struggling on that street it can be very difficult to know where to go for help.

“We have children who are just so nonplussed to be here. It’s all wrong.”

A Department for Work and Pensions spokesman said: “The reasons for people using food banks are complex.

“Universal Credit is a force for good, with 2.2 million people now being supported by the benefit.

“It gives people financial help if they’re unemployed, low-paid or unable to work.

“People can get their first payment on day one of their claim as an advance and we continue to make improvements.”
Ground zero ... Oldham , Greater Manchester ... and Brexit considerations ?


Council assigns £20k for Oldham food bank in case of no-deal Brexit.

The council is worried people won't be able to donate if Brexit leads to food shortages.



Town hall bosses in Oldham have put aside £20k to subsidise food banks in the borough in the event of a no-deal Brexit.

The amount was revealed at a meeting of the full council, where leader Sean Fielding presented a report outlining how the authority intends to handle leaving the European Union .

He told assembled councillors senior officers had formed a project group led by the director of legal services, Paul Entwistle, to assess preparations.

Oldham has been allocated £315k in total from the government towards preparing for exiting the EU, but so far has only designated the use of £20k of that pot.

This cash would be used to support Oldham’s emergency food provision sector, and has now been transferred to providers to support them as they try to feed ‘people in need’.

Coun Fielding said: “We are providing funding to food banks to buy additional food because the anticipation is that as generous Oldham households who donate foodstuff to foodbanks come under more pressure because of the economic fallout of Brexit, they will make fewer donations to food banks.

“There are genuine concerns about the effect on community cohesion of no-deal, not least because in the year after the EU referendum hate crime are recorded to have increased by 29pc.”


Cabinet member for health, Coun Zahid Chauhan added: “If people don’t have food for themselves, how are they going to donate for those who need it?”

Liberal Democrat group leader, Howard Sykes spoke to second the report which he described as ‘very scary’.

“Brexit will leave the costs of all the chaos with the people of Oldham borough with fewer pounds in their pockets,” Coun Sykes added.

But he queried the report’s findings that there had been no problems of ‘community cohesion’, adding it was ‘not my experience’.

Tory group leader, John Hudson – who had been heckling throughout the presentation of the report – told the chamber he thought that Brexit had become a ‘dirty word’.

“I think most people are fed up, whether they voted leave or remain, they just want the damn thing done and move on,” he said.

“You have to remember you’re in a council chamber that represents people and democracy.

“The majority – it was far bigger than any of us got in here. It’s four per cent – I suspect in May many of us would be happy to get four per cent and get back on the council.”

But he added he personally didn’t want no-deal to happen.

The report says in areas like Oldham which are ‘relatively worse off’, households are likely to experience ‘considerably more difficulty in adjusting to negative economic shocks resulting from Brexit in the longer term’.

“Leaving without an actual deal and transitioning to full WTO rules is widely agreed to be the worst option, and it is unclear what the impact would actually be, although potentially seriously disruptive,” it adds.

On Wednesday night government ministers published details of their Yellowhammer contingency plan, after MPs voted to force its release.

It outlines a series of ‘reasonable worst case assumptions’ for the impact of a no-deal Brexit on 31 October.

These include riots on the streets, food price rises and reduced medical supplies.



What next ?

A return to the late 50s / early 60s and d.i.y. fallout shelters stocked to the roof ???

Sirens to announce Brexit ???
Food banks increasing in schools for pupils' families.



More schools in England are setting up food banks to help feed their pupils' families, according to the biggest school governors' organisation.

The National Governance Association's annual survey found 8% of governors were in schools which had food banks - up from 7% last year.

The highest proportion were in the North East - where 13% of governors were in schools with a food bank.

Heads' leader Geoff Barton said schools faced "rising levels of poverty".

"It is a shameful situation in a country which is among the wealthiest in the world," said Mr Barton, leader of the ASCL head teachers' union.

Washing uniforms

The National Governance Association (NGA) surveyed 6,000 governors about the challenges facing their schools.

School governors, who are often volunteers such as parents or representatives of the local community, warned that funding shortages and teacher recruitment were among the biggest problems.

But the survey also showed the rising challenge of having to offer welfare services to families - such as running food banks, offering meals outside of term time and washing pupils' clothes and uniforms.

Food banks, which provide emergency supplies of food, were most common in schools in the north-east of England, the West Midlands and London - and were more likely in nursery and primary schools than in secondary.

Among nursery school governors, 2% reported their schools were providing emergency loans to parents.

Welfare services

"There is an increasing demand on schools to take responsibility for more areas of children's lives than simply their education," said NGA chief executive, Emma Knights.

"School staff have an increased burden of providing welfare services because of chronic underfunding in other areas and particularly cuts to local authority services," she said.

But relying on schools for welfare services was "not a satisfactory solution".

Head teachers have been warning about the growing pressure on schools to provide much more than academic support.

In a survey of more than 400 schools earlier this year, the Association of School and College Leaders found 43% of schools were offering families help with food.

These were not necessarily running regular food banks, but included schools providing food parcels on a more occasional basis.

Head teachers' leader Mr Barton said schools were becoming a "fourth emergency service providing clothing, food and pastoral support to many young people in extremely difficult circumstances".

"These pupils would not be ready to learn without this support," he said.
Ground zero ... Lisburn , Northern Ireland ... and one shop that constantly sells out of all stocks :

Image

Lisburn food bank plea for support after shelves emptied.



A food bank in Lisburn that helps the most vulnerable people in society has said unprecedented demand on the service has left its shelves empty.

The food bank has issued a desperate appeal for donations of vital supplies to ensure that families do not go hungry as the winter months approach.

The organisation has said the combination of benefit reform and cost of returning to school is having a devastating effect on parents who are struggling to make ends meet.

Among the items they are looking for are jam, tinned custard, coffee, non-tomato pasta sauces, sugar, biscuits, porridge and rice pudding. They have also appealed for sanitary products.

A Facebook post, accompanied by pictures of almost empty shelves, said: "We are almost empty. This is a statement we never thought we would make, but with the pressures of school uniforms, the long summer break and of course Universal Credit, we have been very busy in the food bank. While we always have too many baked beans (almost half of our stock is made up of beans), we are low on almost all the other items. Thank you for your ongoing support, every donation is greatly appreciated and put to good use."

Lagan Valley MLA Pat Catney, who has offered his office as a drop-off point for donations, said: "It's an indictment on the society we've created that the demand for supplies from food banks is so overwhelming.

"With the welfare mitigation package due to end in a few months, this situation will only get worse. That's why we've written to the Secretary of State to request an extension of the provisions in the absence of an Executive.

"It is so frustrating that I can't do what I was elected to do and help change the law to protect the most vulnerable here. The price for political failure is being paid by those least able to cope. It's a disgrace."

Charlene Brooks, chief executive of Parenting NI, said households across Northern Ireland are struggling to pay their bills.

"It impacts on mental health, it results in relationships breaking down, it creates stresses that means that perhaps parents aren't able to be the type of parent they would like to be," she said. There is a whole cycle and knock-on effect when parents experience financial difficulties and we must educate and support parents to help them make informed decisions around things like budgets, or even just how to say no to your child when they are asking for an expensive toy."

Lisburn Food Bank is open to receive donations between 11am and 1pm on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday, or there are permanent donation points at Sainsbury's and Tesco.
A view from the inside ... Bristol :

" We knock down the stigma and make it welcoming' " : how to run a chain of foodbanks.

As a charity says universal credit has lead to a higher demand for food banks, a manager talks about what goes into keeping them afloat.


“It’s a big deal for people to come to a food bank,” says Matt Dobson, who runs eight of them across north Bristol. “They’re struggling and in need. We try to knock down the stigma and make it a welcoming environment. There’s always tea, coffee and home-made cakes and the volunteers’ go-to question is ‘How are you?’”

The 29-year-old has been managing the food banks, supported by the Trussell Trust charity, for two years. Between March 2018 and April 2019, volunteers handed out 7,402 three-day emergency food parcels, 3,130 of which went to children. There has been a remarkable increase in the number of people who use them since he started working. “There were 16 people who came into the Horfield outlet when it was open for two hours this afternoon. There has been a 50 to 60 per cent increase in the number of people coming in this summer.”

The roll-out of universal credit, which started in the city in June last year, has been a factor, he says. The complicated application forms and the wait for the first payment, which can take more than five weeks, has forced many people to turn to one of the food banks.

“One family who came in this morning are massively in debt after the school holidays. There are no free school meals in those weeks, and one of the parents had to stop working to look after the kids.

“Both parents are on zero-hours contracts topped up by universal credit. But their application hasn’t been processed yet. They’ve been waiting two months. "


“Another woman who came in today has five children, all under eight. She has started filling in the forms, but it’s a really intense process. We directed her to an organisation that can help her with the forms."

”Since he started managing the food banks, Mr Dobson has created links with other organisations that can help the people who come in. “I’m really passionate about creating a joined-up approach and lots of partnerships, so that we can help people who are struggling through to the other side.”

Different food banks are open at different times and days between Monday and Friday. “There’s always at least one open every day.”

Although there is no shortage of volunteers, food supplies are running low. UHT milk, fruit juice, tinned fish, deodorant and cooking sauces are running out, although there are lots of pulses and pasta left. “We get a lot of support from the community and whenever we do a shout-out, we get a lot of food back, but it’s quite hand-to-mouth at the moment.

“I love Bristol and have lived here almost all my life. I wanted to play a part in seeing it transformed by working with its most vulnerable people.”
Ground zero ... Leeds , West Yorkshire ... and a new , interesting . scheme :

Why shoppers are being urged to swap cans of food for cans of free lager in Leeds.


Kind-hearted Leeds folk are being urged to swap a can of food in exchange in for a free can of lager as part of a new charity initiative to stop hunger.

Camden Town Brewery is encouraging the public to donate to their local food banks when the UK’s first can-for-can swap initiative arrives in the city.

People will be able to make the swap for a can of Harvest Hells lager at Victoria Leeds on Thursday, September 26, from noon until 3pm.

All the food collected will be donated to foodbanks run by The Trussell Trust in east and south Leeds.

John Casey, chair of Leeds South and East Foodbank, said: "Thousands of families across Leeds are at risk every day of not having enough food. That’s why we welcome Camden Town Brewery’s imaginative venture. It will give local people another opportunity to help someone, maybe on their doorstep, who’s in food crisis. By raising awareness of the problem it will also help us to continue to challenge the scandal of hunger in 21st century Britain."

Brewery chiefs are also donating 20p from every can of Harvest Hells lager sold within the first month to its nominated charity, The Felix Project, and the important work they do to help tackle food poverty.

Jasper Cuppaidge, founder of Camden Town Brewery, said: “We’re proud that each of our Seasonal Hells, released throughout the year, have been raising money for good. By donating 20p from each Harvest Hells can sale in this first month, and going on tour across the UK, we’re raising awareness of those experiencing food poverty, and your donations will go towards helping to put food on tables, supporting those in need."
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