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Family carers are abusing their legal powers - Page 2 - Carers UK Forum

Family carers are abusing their legal powers

Discuss news stories and political issues that affect carers.
This is a difficult issue.
My father was in care on a NHS funding and I was visiting most days.
He only lived in care for 7 weeks in care so looking back the money would not had mattered.
I did take mileage out of his money ( a round trip of 18 miles a day ) and 1 thing which may have looked out of order to somebody not knowing the situation was a mobile broadband dongle.
Dad took little interest in anything but he would sit looking at me operating the laptop and appeared to be taking an interest as far as we could tell. The staff at the home knew this. Of course if somebody asked him what he had seen on the laptop 10 minutes later would have been a different issue.
As it happened I had a laptop so I took that to the home so the expenses for just the mobile broadband part amounted to just under £50.
If I did not have a laptop the total expenses would have been nearer to £400.
Dad always wanted his newspaper but the carers saw him on several occasions reading it up side down.
He also wanted things bought in like ice creams, pies and a glass of wine and over a year all of these costs would have mounted up.
At first sight all these expenses may have looked out of order but people knowing the situation would have agreed these expenses were necessary. Also I did not want to deny dad things to increase my inheritance.
Another situation I know of was the Court of Protection authorised the daughter who was a pensioner to spend some of the mother's money on a new car.
The daughter was visiting most days a round trip of 42 miles.
Her mother was in care on full NHS funding and as a result her mother's money was increasing by over £2,000 per month and she had been in care for over 5 years where as her expected life was less than a year.
The daughter went to the Court of Protection and said if she could not get a new car she would probably have to reduce the number of visits to Mum and the daughter was due to inherit Mum's money anyway.
Under normal circumstances a new car would have been a no but under these circumstances using the mother's money for a modest car was authorised.

Brian
This is a very sticky isssue.

I looked after both my husband and my father.

I arranged for my husband's money to be paid in to my account and would transfer what he needed to him. He had no concept of money and the value of things and would just keep spending on what took his eye till all the money was gone. As he was the one with the largest income, we would have been in dire straits if I had left the finances up to him.

He would often rail against my meanness at times, but left to him we would have had more innersoles than shoes, plenty of sweets, but be starving and homeless.

My father was dead set against power of attorney and refused to even look at the form. As he became more unwell and virtually housebound he did agree to add my name to his bank account so that I could deal with most of his affairs.

I was well aware that I was in a position to take advantage of both of them, but I was bound by my love and respect for them and my own sense of integrity and self respect.

Now that I am on my own, it has given me strength and comfort to know that I dealt with them fairly and honestly and suported them to the best of my ability.
Hi Audrey

You said this is a very sticky issue.
Do you mean the type of expenses I mentioned in the previous thread or the general thread?.
I was a bit hesitant about taking the money for mobile broadband out of Dad's money and I think the woman may be taking a bit of a chance with buying the car using her mother's money.
I can understand her logic as the mother's money is increasing all the time and the main mileage on the car is for visiting and running around for her mother.
She is the only living child and I am so there will not be any dispute with any sibling.
The main problem which could happen is if her mother ceases to qualify for NHS funding at any point and the money runs out Social Services may ask for the return of the car purchase money.

Brian
Anyone interested in this topic should be sure to read the Sunday Times tomorrow, and perhaps try and get a copy of today's edition. It deals with a home in Hampshire (where I also live) and the way a group of residents in a Mencap home were overcharged by more than £60,000. This weekend is likely to be a "watershed" moment, in the same way that Winterbourne View exposed the physical abuse of those with learning difficulties. I have been working with some of the people concerned, investigating the way my son's finances were recorded. This is a story which is likely to run and run, seeing very real changes for all concerned. I have been invited to meet with the journalist concerned, who also happens to be a barrister, in the new year.
This could well be vindication eh BB?
When I complained to the County Council, they blamed me for being a pain, one member of staff even said I was suffering from a mental illness, separation anxiety. After I made a subject access request, I was stunned. After M. was wrongly sued for £10,000, mainly because the County Council payments did not show on his accounts, I naturally turned to the CC for help. One member of staff wrote to another "Now look what she's trying to drag us into now!" That is just one example of the mud slinging in my direction. Another person, who had never met me, wrote "As soon as I saw the name I knew it meant trouble". She was later made to apologise for that one. Despite years of problems and complaints, nothing positive happened. I was even promised that all my travelling expenses would be refunded. I am yet to see a penny. Not one of the social workers, the very people who are supposed to be protecting people with LD, could understand the simplest possible accounts. How difficult can it be to account for where £80 per week goes? My son has been routinely financially abused since he was 16 years old, he is now 34. I will happily work with anyone who can ensure that his money is properly spent on him - after all, that it my legal duty as his DWP appointee.
A relative had EPoA for my mother and stole over £15k from her. Went to a solicitor but only got £5K back. He is the scum of the earth tricking like that. Works for the church. You could not make it up. Grrrrr.
I don't think the article suggested a 'majority' were on the fiddle, Charles. I do think that some families have very different approaches to managing household accounts, and to some extent "an Englishman's home is his castle": it is only really someone else's business where inherited wealth is concerned or where larceny is taking place such as that described, and very few people with mental health problems have vast fortunes, IMHO.
It's not about massive sums of money, Scally. And the article does not emphasise the low numbers of family members involved: it simply tells its stories - which implies that it's very common and these are merely examples.