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NHS failing carers and those with dementia! - Carers UK Forum

NHS failing carers and those with dementia!

Discuss news stories and political issues that affect carers.
Care home patients fed by tube ‘to cut costs’

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... rrer=yahoo

NHS refuses free care for Alzheimer's gran who lived for four days with body of dead husband

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... z0boq252Eb

When does the NHS pay for Care?

http://www.alzheimers.org.uk/site/index.php
I have just read the report on PEG feeding in The Times and The Telegraph, there is an interesting comment on the story in The Times , currently the only comment, stating that it is doctors, not care home staff, who make these decisions but I think that we all know that, as with using anti-psychotics to manage dementia suffers in care homes, those decisions are based on the requests and reports of the care home staff and are frequently clinically unjustified.
There was a similar report some time ago about the unnecessary use of PEG feeding in hospitals and we as a family had a similar situation when my step-grandmother was in hospital, in this case they wanted to catheterise her, not for clinical reasons, but because they did not have the staff to take her to the lavatory and she had a fall, which they had done nothing about until my aunt visited and asked what had happened to her, it then transpired that she had broken her wrist, trying to go on her own, we all said no giving good clinical reasons why it was not in her interests; lack of sufficient staff should never be a reason for clinical interventions, with all the attendant risks, infection, etc., of this nature.
Daughter has an NG tube for fluids as she has great difficulty swallowing liquids. She eats solids - which are easier to swallow than fluids. I have been subjected to pressure to abandon feeding her solids - one doctor even cited 'it would be easier' as the reason!
I'd like to see them try and push her wheelchair past a place she knows serves great cheesecake!!!!!!!!!
My dad is doing really well on the PEG feeding. He used to aspirate a lot and we didn't know - we thought his coughing was just part of the stroke and the leukemia but it wasn't and he was losing a lot of weight because the food he was eating was not reaching his stomach.

He hasn't eaten or drunk anything now for the last three years. Misses the odd beer and the odd whisky he used to have and we have trouble trying to think what to buy him for father's day (he used to love us to get him 6 cans of beer but he can't touch it anymore now).

But he has gained weight and doesn't choke as much as he used to.

Eun
My husband still occasionally aspirates food or drink but he has managed to progress over time from pureed food which he aspirated to soft food without too much difficulty and eats a wide range of foods now although the food tends to get cold because he has to eat it in very small mouthfuls using a teaspoon so that he does not overload. The main problem he has is with saliva, he cannot seem to tell when his voice is "wet" and I also have to wake him at night and try to clear him which makes him ever so grumpy! I do agree to him taking some risks with food, if I had not he would still be eating pureed food, because I think that the pleasure of eating and drinking, not only the taste, texture and aroma but also the social aspect of eating a meal with family or friends, is worth trying to preserve if possible, sadly it is not an option for some.
the social aspect of eating a meal with family or friends, is worth trying to preserve if possible, sadly it is not an option for some.
Expecially not if you have grumpy teenagers in the house who insist on trying to eat either whilst watching TV, texting their friends, or with their iPhones on - grrrr Image
Telegraph

Today's real oldies are the people, in their 80s or 90s, who have outlived the Saga Generation, grown frail, lost their marbles, and ended up dependent on carers. And theirs is the most unenviable lot. They are sometimes the victims of what is known as Elder Abuse, occasionally inflicted on them by professional carers but more often, and more shockingly, by their own children.