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DAVE OR ED WHO CARES - Page 2 - Carers UK Forum

DAVE OR ED WHO CARES

Discuss news stories and political issues that affect carers.
I am delighted that Ed Miliband won the Labour leadership contest and as far as I am concerned he is the right man for the job. He’s my MP so is Rosie Winterton and both are very receptive to carers issues but the main party line of Labour is to get people off benefits back into work to combated poverty and this will affect many carers'.

http://www.carersuk.org/Newsandcampaign ... efitreform

At least he listens New Labour didn't

He is going to marry is partner but will not be pushed into it by the media!
if carers are no longer carers who will care for our loved ones i care 24/7
how can i possibly go back to work its totall stupidity
the person i care for would have to return to hospital.
it makes no sense to me and would cost this crazy goverment more money not less.
if carers are no longer carers who will care for our loved ones i care 24/7
how can i possibly go back to work its totall stupidity
the person i care for would have to return to hospital.
it makes no sense to me and would cost this crazy goverment more money not less.
Nobody is going to force anyone to stop caring and go out to work. But it is a good idea to have economic incentives, isnt it?
I've heard your argument used many times here, and whilst I dont know your circumstances, I would have to ask why you are so sure that another person or persons, properly paid, qualified or unqualified - could not do the caring duties that you perform, leaving you free to go out to work? I mean, we are all flesh and blood, caring is not an unusual task to pay someone to do (there are millions of people employed in the sector) and it is rarely so specialist that skills cannot be transferred. Plus, most importantly of all, we carers all need a break, we all need money, and work is a great way to be more independent financially as well as having some job satisfaction.

After all, many of us carers - perhaps half of us or more - do exactly that. We trust someone else to look after our loved one, and of course we try to choose wisely and monitor them closely. And this is good for the economy, because it creates an extra job as well as liberating two people from the benefits system. So its not stupidity to me, its common sense, really, isnt it?
if carers are no longer carers who will care for our loved ones i care 24/7
how can i possibly go back to work its totall stupidity
the person i care for would have to return to hospital.
it makes no sense to me and would cost this crazy goverment more money not less.
I've heard this argument used many times here, and whilst I dont know your circumstances, I would have to ask why you are so sure that another person or persons, properly paid, qualified or unqualified - could not do the caring duties that you perform, leaving you free to go out to work? I mean, we are all flesh and blood, caring is not an unusual task to pay someone to do (there are millions of people employed in the sector) and it is rarely so specialist that skills cannot be transferred. Plus, most importantly of all, we carers all need a break, we all need money, and work is a great way to be more independent financially as well as having some job satisfaction.

After all, many of us carers - perhaps half of us or more - do exactly that. We trust someone else to look after our loved one, and of course we try to choose wisely and monitor them closely. And this is good for the economy, because it creates an extra job as well as liberating two people from the benefits system. So its not stupidity to me, its common sense, really, isnt it?
Allowing for the fact that you said you didn't know personal circumstances but there must be many who are up half the night as the caring isn't 9-5 it is quite often through the night and that in itself would make it extremely difficult to hold down a job, don't you think?
Vicky
A lot of parents have to get up through the night to care for a baby, and whilst it isnt ideal, it doesnt stop them working. But many carers do not have to get up through the night, I have no idea what the true figures are, maybe we should try to find out rather than just extrapolate from our own personal situation - after all, we are talking about millions of people here, all of whose circumstances are different?
I don't think there is any comparison with getting up for a baby and working, I have done that and in the full knowledge that it isn't a forever thing, the baby is small and easy to manage compared to a 13 yr old with GERD thrashing around.
New mums are not expected to work and do this any way, they get maternity leave.
It would be interesting to know how many do through the night care but I would hope governments would look at cases individually and not decide that if the vast majority could go to work assuming that is the case then so can everyone.
Vicky
A lot of parents have to get up through the night to care for a baby, and whilst it isnt ideal, it doesnt stop them working. But many carers do not have to get up through the night, I have no idea what the true figures are, maybe we should try to find out rather than just extrapolate from our own personal situation - after all, we are talking about millions of people here, all of whose circumstances are different?
And up to a point, that's true.

But my eldest stopped needing support at night on a regular basis by the time he was four, if not before. Even then it wasn't every night after a few months.

Mike still does most nights, sometimes more than once. 25 years is a long time. My job matters to me but it's a constant struggle I could do without. I'm exhausted - and even with the daytime support Mike had, I've been rapidly reaching the point where I couldn't carry on. Fortunately we've got a good package for Mike and he moves out on Friday night, with most of his stuff being moved on Saturday. But with the cuts that are coming, that sort of package will be much harder to get, and I believe we're going to see a lot more carers go into crisis.
Unfortunately, the carer returning to a job would need to earn more than the hourly rate for the professional careworker (as well additionally to cover travel costs etc) in order to make it worthwhile So it might just be a possibility for the high earner but not for the majority of carers, some of whom would love to return to the work scene. I believe in some parts of the country it costs £12 per hour to have help. Perhaps the government could consider opening more day centres where the carees could be left for a reasonable sum daily. When my daughter was caring for her Down's Syndrome three year old plus two other children she found it cost her more than she could earn just to pay for childcare.
Unfortunately, the carer returning to a job would need to earn more than the hourly rate for the professional careworker (as well additionally to cover travel costs etc) in order to make it worthwhile So it might just be a possibility for the high earner but not for the majority of carers, some of whom would love to return to the work scene. I believe in some parts of the country it costs £12 per hour to have help. Perhaps the government could consider opening more day centres where the carees could be left for a reasonable sum daily. When my daughter was caring for her Down's Syndrome three year old plus two other children she found it cost her more than she could earn just to pay for childcare.
Yes, I wasnt imagining most people could employ care staff without help from the State. Which is why there are tax credits to help pay for childcare.
A similar system could be used for respite, or it could be funded through self-directed payments (as in my case, but as I employ teenagers/students as peer-supporters and live in a low wage area, I only pay just above the minimum wage, it averages out at £5 an hour).

there are some handy figures here]http://www.carersuk.org/Newsandcampaign ... bersdouble[/url]
You can't really compare caring for a severely physically disabled person for example with caring for a baby through the night.

Before our son got his bed with the special pressure mattress etc we were up 4 times a night (at least) every night physically turning someone nearly 6 feet tall. No wonder my husband collapsed with the strain of working full time and caring as well.

If Rob has a chest infection we are up at night putting him on the cough assist machine and nebulising him etc.

To work full time for some of us is not possible because even if you are not up during the night there is the intense level of caring required. The majority of your wages would be spent on paying for the care so what is the point? Rob has been assessed as needing two workers for most tasks which is why we do the majority as the social work department don't want to pay for the care he needs.