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Carers UK Forum • CARERS BACK TO WORK
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CARERS BACK TO WORK

Posted: Thu Apr 15, 2010 7:21 pm
by g.herschel
Can i make one thing clear , i would love to "get back to work" bit i strongly believe that the system that would allow me to return to work is flawed , if the state wanted me to return to work with their help what would they offer , free personal care at home , would this allow me to return to work ? the amount of care on offer is about 7 hours per week, and the disabled person you care for must need help with critical needs feeding , drinking , toileting & personal hygiene, many will be refused this care...
if the state supplied someone to care for the old doll at home who pays then ? we have to pay for all respite care ( except the 4 weeks per year from M.O.D.) why should the tax payer pick up the bill for the old doll`s care, £600, £700, £800 per week to allow me to work, for what may be minimum wage , care begins at home we should be "employed " as carers for our elderly disabled relatives , and not at a massive wage even if we received the same as the state pension , i am sure that would be okay .
care / rest homes - looks like if you can pay you will still have to pay for the next 5 years anyway , if the old doll was in care the cost to the state would still be much higher then if she was at home being cared for by me ..
we need help and support to care for our relatives within our home , that is what the government have said time after time, they want the elderly to remain within their own home and be cared for with respect , dignity & compassion and thats just what a family member can supply and at a lower cost then any "national care service" or "free personal care at home " system will ever do .....
to sum up the government dont need me to "get back to work " as i am working already it`s called being a carer....

Hear Hear George I agree

Posted: Thu Apr 15, 2010 7:23 pm
by Eun
Hear Hear George I agree in full with your post - some of us are already working more hours than than we would be in a full time job.

Eun

Some of us are doing

Posted: Thu Apr 15, 2010 9:54 pm
by charles47
Some of us are doing both. My average working week is well over 35 hours, and so is my average caring week.

There's no easy answer. The government talks about getting more carers into work but they need to make it a lot easier for those who want to. Let's be clear about this. There are carers out there - George and Eun both, for examples - who have stated they would like to return to work but that it's impossible to do so.

CUK says that's wrong. If a carer wants to work they should receive the help they need to do so. I happen to agree with that.

Equally, if a carer chooses to remain at home to care, they should receive the help they need to do that too. And Carers Allowance doesn't begin to cover it.

Charles - of course it

Posted: Thu Apr 15, 2010 11:56 pm
by Boggle
Charles - of course it is wrong for those of us who would like to work not to be able to - but CUK needs to be aware that it is not always the lack of the help alone that presents the major barrier.

There is no practical way that I could return to work - even if we were provided with the 24/7 level of care that my daughter needs. Her care is so complicated (curtesy of the idiots in the NHS etc.!) that I could not risk leaving her with people who would be doing things according to rules and policies that take no account of her real needs - she would be dead within a month!

So ALL the reasons people are unable to work need to looked at.

Tell you what - would CUK promote the need for carers to get grants in order to set up the own businesses? Many of us could manage to work if we could work for ourselves from home. Given the low level of benefits we receive the set up costs would obviously prevent this - so if the gov provided substantial grants to assist with set up and allowed us to retain all benefits for the first two years so that we would not be in fear of starvation/whilst our busifesses got up and running-then within two years many of us could'be working and cff benefits and paying taxes - the savings from this would more than cover the cost of the inital grants.

I DARE Cuk to promote this!!!! Image Image Image

Well I don't want to

Posted: Fri Apr 16, 2010 12:19 am
by MaryB
Well I don't want to re-enter paid employment as I am the best person to care for my son, in my case it isn't open to debate.

Boggle, I back that idea. I think

Posted: Fri Apr 16, 2010 12:33 am
by entity
Boggle,

I back that idea.

I think fulltime carers should be offered grants to help them setup their own businesses if that is what they wish to do. The government should offer grants and free training to carers in my view.
I set up my own business a year ago now, through the help of CIDA and can access workshops and training for free but never got a grant unlike some young people!

http://www.cida.org/

Charles - of course it

Posted: Fri Apr 16, 2010 6:37 am
by charles47
Charles - of course it is wrong for those of us who would like to work not to be able to - but CUK needs to be aware that it is not always the lack of the help alone that presents the major barrier.

There is no practical way that I could return to work - even if we were provided with the 24/7 level of care that my daughter needs. Her care is so complicated (curtesy of the idiots in the NHS etc.!) that I could not risk leaving her with people who would be doing things according to rules and policies that take no account of her real needs - she would be dead within a month!

So ALL the reasons people are unable to work need to looked at.
I think I've said in earlier discussions that some carers cannot return to work at all. Sorry if I omitted that from my earlier post - I was well tired when I posted it having had some really heavy days at work and then Mike kicking off big time.

There are other issues too. For those of us who are at work there's little understanding of the difficulties. I've got a crushing migraine today but I've still got to get Mike up and ready, get Gill going and get to work as I have a training engagement and there's no one else available to take it on. Fortunately because I work for a carers centre there's at least the understanding of my issues and the staff are really supportive (most of us are carers or former carers in fact), but I think there needs to be a study into the health of carers who also work: I'm not entirely convinced the news would be as good...

Charles - hope you haven't

Posted: Fri Apr 16, 2010 2:37 pm
by Boggle
Charles - hope you haven't got the same virus that keeps attacking us - migraine has been a central feature this week!
But I still have to get daughter up, wash, clothe and feed her (constantly! - but don't tell the doctors because they are convinced I don't feed her and would have me sectioned if they thought I did!!!!) - must also do her medications, lift her, drive her, push her wheelchair, etc. etc.
Time to work would be a bonus!!!!!!

Many times, I have dreamed

Posted: Fri Apr 16, 2010 3:26 pm
by Lazydaisy
Many times, I have dreamed of what I would do if I won the lottery. It always comes back to finding something that would give Ben a chance in life too. I have thought about opening a small bookshop(I would love that),a coffee chop or a B and B, where Ben would have chances to help out and gain responsibility too. I would not have to think about care support for him, because I would be there, his main Carer, to consider his Diabetes needs.
Ben wants to get a horse if we win the lottery, that he could have sole charge for.
These are only dreams, but they would be definite chances, with the right money, and Ben would still be safe, as well as developing independence where he could. His Diabetes would be cared for as it is at home at present. I know the times he needs to test his blood and do his insulin, and any business would be fitted in around his needs.

Hi all It might be me,

Posted: Fri Apr 16, 2010 3:59 pm
by Matt Hill
Hi all

It might be me, but I seem to be detecting a recurrent theme in some threads. This idea that somehow carers being supported to do paid work is where Carers UK's priorities are and therefore carers who don't work are being neglected sidelined etc.

It seems quite divisive to me, to try and pit one group of carers against the other and certainly Carers UK does not favour one over the other.

It is true that Carers UK has done lots of work on the pressures of care and paid work - this is because we received a huge grant from the European social fund over 5 years (2002-2007) to do a massive programme of research and practice about this very subject. We have tons of research about it. And Boggle you are right, it is not just replacement care that puts a barrier up. The reasons are many - poor care is one, out of date benefits system, bad employment practice, Lack of understanding amongst Jobcentre Plus staff, inflexible rules on direct payments.

Anyone interested can read our research at
http://www.carersuk.org/Professionals/R ... tandcaring

The fact remains that even with the best systems in place there will always be some carers for whom paid work is simply not an option due to the seriousness of the care needs they are dealing with. Government has to recognise this and support those carers properly and that will always be one of Carers UK's main campaigning aims.

However the facts remain that most carers are of working age and more than half of all carers are in paid work. 1 in 6 are forced to give up work to care. Many carers who cannot work wish they could. By 2014 we will have reached the tipping point when the numbers of older people needing care will already have outstripped the numbers of people able to provide it. It is an important topic.

Matt

PS - The grants for business starts up idea is a great one. Especially tying it into benefits continuation, allowing people time to see if it workable.