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BBC News - Carers and depression - POLL - Page 5 - Carers UK Forum

BBC News - Carers and depression - POLL

Discuss news stories and political issues that affect carers.
Thanks Charles, already downloaded!
My local Carers Centre sent us a cheque for me and Mrs Scally to take a long weekend break, from some carers fund they had access to. We went walking in the Lake District and stayed at a nice, comfy but not posh country hotel. Daughter #2 took care of the piglet. I have to admit I really enjoyed it: I didn't think I needed time out but actually, I really did. It made me realise how much we are working shifts and rarely spend quality time together.
That's the point: the effects of caring are insidious and even the most balanced life needs a break.
[quote]That's the point]
Yes: I think we are heading in the right direction, luckily J is genuinely becoming more independent and responsible, and we can leave him for longer periods in the house on his own or trust him overnight with other people. I think the critically important thing was beating incontinence, it took far longer than expected to get there, but he is now almost 100% independent in that department. I can leave him in the house for an hour or two by himself without any serious worries, e.g. to attend a doctors appointment or nip out for a short work assignment. It feels good.
Hi Scally, I was led to believe that M would stop learning much by his mid 20's, however that is totally wrong. At 34, he seems to be learning things faster and faster, his language in particular has come on in leaps and bounds. He is extremely organised now, in a way I would never have believed possible even 10 years ago. It's just a matter of lots and lots of tiny steps towards independence.
Hi Scally, I was led to believe that M would stop learning much by his mid 20's, however that is totally wrong. At 34, he seems to be learning things faster and faster, his language in particular has come on in leaps and bounds. He is extremely organised now, in a way I would never have believed possible even 10 years ago. It's just a matter of lots and lots of tiny steps towards independence.
Or indeed, drives! J is taking driving lessons - he hasn't progressed beyond first gear yet, and he is still mastering steering, but he is on the public roads, and I have faith that he will eventually get into second gear, and who knows, one day he may become one of that small group of people with DS who have passed their driving test. I firmly believe that he can do anything he sets his mind to, given time and sensible instruction. If so, you'll be the first to hear about it!
Scally, I will be watching eagerly for a pass.We always hoped that our son would be able to drive,but he has some problems to his eyes,combination of both Downs Syndrome and Diabetes,so not able to get a licence.
He has done off-road driving in a Landrover and loves it.He went as his Dad's sighted guide with the local Visual Impairment group. They drove through fields and my husband(who was also in the landrover),said he was brilliant. He looked in the mirror before doing any manoeuvres, he loved reversing and used the gears he needed to use when he was going forward.
M has been driving away from the public roads for many years, but his concentration and reading ability mean that passing a test, for him, is a non starter. He has his own garden tractor, and loves driving our 12 ton steam roller. Sadly, the day care centre, run mainly by female staff, won't entertain the idea of having a garden tractor there. They have acres of grass, and I've even offered to donate a garden tractor to them, to no avail.