Stop the vilifying of the disabled

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Scally, as usual, is way out of line.

Please pay his comments no heed.
It is a disgrace - I agree with this subject wholeheartedly and when I lecture on disability I make sure I convey to the audience that so called actual benefit cheats by virtue of their title are not people or families with disability, they are people who are feigning this ie not people with disability or chronic illness.

I then explain to them that many of my neighbours appeared to be consumed with jealousy when the council painted a parking bay outside my house. They were of course jealous of the designated patch of kerbside and not apparently of the role I have 24/7 in caring for my son.

I think this issue is actually exacerbated by the media, I believe it is a disgrace, when you think how the country apparently became genuinely inclusive overnight during the Paralympics and how disappointed some of us were to see this attitude fade quite quickly as cuts and slashed services have kicked in.

I explain to people about illness and disablement as akin to a minority group but one which any of us can join at anytime, young or old - unlike other minority groups. I am only a carer but I am proud to stand up for us and will fight for better support for all disabled or ill people or their families.

The amount of fraudulent benefit claims (even if they have nothing to do with our families or loved ones) amounts to a very modest sum compared to the billions lost in tax evasion, and it is nominal compared to the sheer amount we as carers save the UK.

A really important subject whoever we are cared for or carer, you'd hope wouldn't you that any civilised person would have the humanity to not believe media hysterics and political scaremongering. It is easier to hide behind the fall out from people turning inward on friends and neighbours as at least then they won't focus so closely on politically directed social engineering Image
Agree with Jane, I find Scally's comments a little blunt and scathing too. Not everyone can spell but who cares? As long as the message is conveyed.
More than one spelling mistake yet there's at least four? And you find "the disabled" offensive? Oh dear.
I'm sick and tired of Political Correctness and who finds what offensive.
Me - I'm a deafie and I don't mind using the term Deafie. And Hearies for hearing people. Yet on another Facebook group I recently joined, I got slammed for using the terms Deafies and Hearies. Needless to say, I quickly quit the clique group. And many deaf people HATE being classified as disabled. They ARE bluddy disabled, fer chrisakes! A hearing loss IS a disability!

Honestly. I despair.......

To Scally.......

Cna yuo raed tihs? if yuo cna raed tihs, yuo hvae a sgtrane mnid, too.

I cdnuolt blveiee taht I cluod aulatcly uesdnatnrd waht I was rdanieg. The phaonmneal pweor of the hmuan mnid, aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it dseno't mtaetr in waht oerdr the ltteres in a wrod are, the olny iproamtnt tihng is taht the frsit and lsat ltteer be in the rghit pclae.

The rset can be a taotl mses and you can sitll raed it whotuit a pboerlm. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe.



Azanmig hhu? Yaeh, and I awlyas tghuhot slpeling was ipmorantt!
I was being deliberately blunt. If I don't know about the law, I consult a solicitor, if I don't understand finance, I talk to an accountant. And if I can't spell, I use a spellchecker, which has the merit of being free. If you want to speak to the government on behalf of us all, and lack key literacy skills, then there are plenty of people here who are only too happy to help by proofreading and editing. Fail to prepare, and prepare to fail. It's a cruel, cruel world out there, isn't it?
"Lets all come together"
Sure, in that case lets all have a chance to help to draft something that will make an impact by being consulted before, not after, the event. That particular petition failed to gain momentum because it was badly written and demonstrated a total disregard of the support available freely on this list.
Just a quick comment:

You can be sure that anyone in government reading petitions will check grammar and spelling. You can be sure that getting it "right" is hugely important if we want to ensure that everyone is "on the same page". Believe it or not, the emotional approach does not generally work unless you have the ear of the Daily Mail.

Most of us don't.

Scally made an honest point, honestly - TWO YEARS AGO. If people want to make a point, by all means do - but let's see if someone can put together a petition that will actually get people to read it.

One other point: "the disabled" is an expression that does not allowed disabled people to be people. Just "disabled." My son is much more than that.
It's a crowded market. Petitions need to be very carefully worded - ideally using a team-drafting approach - to capture the public imagination. This petition for the prevention of cruelty to rabbits has gained over 6,000 signatures: http://epetitions.direct.gov.uk/petitions/49086 - whilst the petition above gained less than 500.
I do think that petitions are a useful tool, but just imagine that we all dashed them off every time we felt miffed? None of them would work! The best petitions are very carefully worded and make a clear, realistic, point of action, and then are flashed across to a large number of supporters using social media and networking. We know from Pat's petition that we are having problems getting carer's petitions over the 100,000 hurdle, hopefully we can beat that soon, but it will take a lot of thought and careful drafting.
To be fair, the Rabbit petition has probably gained more popularity for two reasons.
One - it's an animal, something close to many animal lovers hearts. Animals always win over most anything else.
Two - it's probably been "advertised" more widely than the "above" petition.

In short, nothing to do with "careful wording, correct spelling or even careful drafting".
I don't think this is a fair comparison but hey ho.

As for using a Spell Checker - even Spell Checkers are not infallible and are of little use to those who are dyslexic.

charles47 - I'm surprised at you.
charles47 - I'm surprised at you.

Gary to be fair to Charles - he was pointing out that the original post and Scally's response to it was made two years ago !
Gary, these days you're not taken seriously if you don't think things through. Or people take the wrong message. If your message is anything less than spot on, then you reinforce the message that disabled people are ill-educated spongers. It doesn't matter what the truth is, what we believe, or the damage that is being caused by ill-conceived dogma.

It's how it presents.

And yes, I'm full of surprises.
Well, I'm going to put myself, unpopularly I expect Image in the "get it right" camp. I'm afraid however well meaning and passionate one is, no one will take you seriously if you submit any type of document littered with spelling and grammatical errors. I once got rid of a solicitor for this very reason and I noted that a year down the line he was no longer in business - coincidence maybe, but hearsay tells me otherwise.

Getting the point across in a succinct and forceful message, properly written, is vital.

I hear of so many people getting aggravated because they have made a written complaint and are not happy with the response. But so many people who write complaints don't ever explain what they actually want from the company/organisation - they just reel off how angry they are and then of course, all they will get is an apology.

There has to be reason, evidence, justification and outcome along with demonstrating that you have taken time and care in the composition - which includes spelling and grammar - if you are looking for things to change.