Recognising Fathers: a chance for fathers to be heard!

Take part in research or give your opinion in a survey.
Recognising Fathers: a chance for fathers to be heard!

The Foundation for People with Learning Disabilities is keen to hear about the experiences of fathers who have a child with a learning disability.

We are asking fathers to complete a questionnaire so that we can learn about the impact it has had on their lives, for example, their involvement in child care or changes they have made to their employment. The questionnaire can either be completed on-line or by requesting a printed copy.

Are you the father of a child aged 19 or under who has learning disabilities? If so, please visit http://www.learningdisabilities.org.uk to find out more or to take part in the survey on-line.

Are you in touch with fathers through your work or support networks? If so, could you please tell them about this survey and see if they are interested in taking part. If they are could you please give them the above details of where to find the on-line survey or if they would like a paper copy please ask them to phone Justin at the Foundation for People with Learning Disabilities on 0207 8031144.

We are very keen to reach fathers in different parts of the UK and with a wide variety of experiences- please help us in the area where you work. This survey is part of the Recognising Fathers project. We will use the information to think about how fathers and families could receive better support through changes in policy and practice.
This is a really good project and is starting to produce some excellent results. Many fathers are excluded from carers groups, often because meetings and AGMs are held during the week in the middle of the working day. As men still tend to earn more money than women, they are more likely (like me) to be juggling work with care. Its not a nice feeling to be excluded from attending carers meetings, or to take a day off work to attend only to find that everyone else there is a woman, often considerably older and with very different needs and interests.

I have recently started a Sunday afternoon climbing club for kids with Down Syndome living in the West of Scotland and their parents...as you can guess this mainly attracts boys and dads, and is a great way to network. There are other ways to get together than have boring committee meetings! Other good ideas are visits to football matches and pub evenings.

There is also a forum for fathers of children with disabilities at:
http://fathers.myfreeforum.org/index.php - any dad is welcome to join in the discussion.

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Excal said
I have recently started a Sunday afternoon climbing club for kids with Down Syndome living in the West of Scotland and their parents
Well done.Good luck with this venture.

Rosemary