Replacing high level light bulbs

Share your ideas about the practical side of caring.
I've only fairly recently discovered you can use LED bulbs in old fashioned lights. They give quite a reasonable and instant light plus low energy. I had to get a dimmer switch replaced to get them compatable with a dimmer switch but well worth it when one of you likes bright lights and the other one dimmer lights.
Henrietta wrote:I've only fairly recently discovered you can use LED bulbs in old fashioned lights. They give quite a reasonable and instant light plus low energy. I had to get a dimmer switch replaced to get them compatable with a dimmer switch but well worth it when one of you likes bright lights and the other one dimmer lights.
oh yes Henrietta, you don't have to change your existing light fittings ! Just don't do I like did recently and pick up the first pack that comes to hand, get home and find they've got a screw fitting and not a bayonet fitting - was a job and a half to get Sainsburys to change them 'cos I no longer had the receipt :roll:
I've got a ' mother and child' lamp. Have the best of both worlds with the dimmer at the top and bright reading light that's adjustable. May not suit everyone's decor but I'm so glad I have it.
Sue, I've done that in the past, bought the wrong fittings re light bulbs!!
Albert_1604 wrote:One problem I increasingly face is replacing light bulbs up at high level.
As one gets on, climbing up step ladders with no one to steady them
becomes risky. I prefer using the old type filament light bulbs.

So on some of my house high level lamps I have fitted an extension
using a lamp plug, about 2 ft feet of wire into a new light socket.

Now when a bulb reaches the end of its life I can easily reach it.
The lower light is not in best lighting position but it is safe, and for me, a
carer on his own, that is more important.
I am not sure why you prefer old type filament lamps, as you say, Albert. The new energy-efficient ones last much longer, apart from saving electricity, so you would need to replace them much less frequently. In particular, the new l.e.d. types avoid most of the perceived problems of the earlier fluorescent ones.

You could consider a newer, larger step ladder, for the occasions when you may still need one, preferably a lightweight aluminium type. On a larger one you will be safer and feel more confident at the same height. I suspect your present step ladder may be a little inadequate for the job.

Your solution of fitting extension leads to your ceiling lights sounds a practical one, but I am concerned that you could create new problems with low-dangling lights.
Thanks all for suggestions. The lower light seems to
illuminate the room OK. I guess I prefer filament lights
as they seem to give a softer yellowish light, although
new lights can simulate this. Although a better ladder may help
there is so much at stake for my wife if I ever fell of any ladder.

Best to stay on terra firma. :)
susieq wrote:
jenny lucas wrote:Susie, thank you. My next problem is trying to work what the HELL is the equivalent to a 60 W bulb!!! It's SO confusing now (I blame the French - it's their revenge for Waterloo, forcing us to use their stupid metric units blah blah)
it's usually written on the carton :)
generally -
42w low energy bulb = 60w old bulb (625 lumens)
70w low energy bulb = 100w old bulb (1175 lumens)

although the numbers can vary depending on whether the bulbs are halogen or LED ones. If you have a branch of Ryness near you their staff will be able to advise you; alternatively if you visit their website at the bottom the page they have a series of guides giving information on all the different types of bulbs available :) https://www.ryness.co.uk/
This has nothing to do with metrication. It is the case that modern lamps are so much more efficient; they give much more light for the same wattage.

It is in our interest to get used to the idea of expressing light output in lumens. This gives the best means of comparison. However, I appreciate this may be a bit technical for some, so let's get back to Jenny's question - how do you find the equivalent?

Over the past 30 or so years I have found that people that try to replace a filament lamp with an "equivalent light output" low-energy lamp are disappointed. Often manufacturers' claims are a bit "contrived".

My advice would be to go for the "divide by five" rule, to replace a tungsten filament lamp with a l.e.d. one. So for a 60 W filament lamp choose a 12 W l.e.d. lamp. For a 100 W filament lamp replace with a 20 W l.e.d. lamp.

By doing this you will enjoy more light but will still save a lot of electricity and replace your lamps very, very infrequently.
[quote="Denis_1610By doing this you will enjoy more light but will still save a lot of electricity and replace your lamps very, very infrequently.[/quote]

Of course, if one uses electricity to heat a room in the winter
then the filament type lamp will add to the heat and so the room
thermostat will cut out that tiny bit sooner so saving.

A 100w bulb running in a room where a 1kilowatt fire is used adds
10% to the heating. One gets the cost of the filament light for free
as it were. In the summer lights are not used so much so filament
cost goes down.
Albert_1604 wrote:
Denis_1610 wrote:By doing this you will enjoy more light but will still save a lot of electricity and replace your lamps very, very infrequently.
Of course, if one uses electricity to heat a room in the winter
then the filament type lamp will add to the heat and so the room
thermostat will cut out that tiny bit sooner so saving.

A 100w bulb running in a room where a 1kilowatt fire is used adds
10% to the heating. One gets the cost of the filament light for free
as it were. In the summer lights are not used so much so filament
cost goes down.
I have heard this argument before but, sorry, I am afraid it is flawed.
  • Electricity is not an economical way to heat a building compared with alternatives, though I realise that sometimes it may be the only option. This applies to both heat from a proper electric heater and heat from a light bulb.
  • Heat rises, so the heat from a bulb suspended from the ceiling will just warm ceiling level and have little effect on heating the room.
  • In summer evenings you may want light but not heat, so heat from a bulb is sheer waste.
Go for efficiency, where possible, with both your heating and lighting arrangements.