Nightclubbing Advice

Share your ideas about the practical side of caring.
Good Afternoon everyone,

I am a carer for a young man with multiple disabilities as a result of an accident. Although we do lots of great activities together that we both enjoy, his favourite activity is going to nightclubs! This is not a problem in itself but I think most nightclubs are years behind other venues and activities in terms of being accessible and suitable for people with disabilities. One issue is that nightclubs are often designed with no disabled access so that it often means people with mobility issues like the young man I support often have to walk up and down stairs dodging drunk people as we go. Another issue is that drunk people in nightclubs are often more aggressive, rude, impatient and mean than the general public and will often ignore, point, stare, laugh, mock and even record the young man I support which causes him great distress. It's really heartbreaking to see how when we go to a nightclub the inaccessibility and ignorance of others can ruin his weekend and really upset him. However he will always want to go back the week after and the cycle continues. If I suggest that this wouldn't be a good idea then he will obsess with wanting to go more.

I'm not saying that people with disabilities shouldn't go clubbing at all and I've tried alternatives like going to parties with friends who would all be nice and respectful to him but he still would much rather go clubbing. Does anyone have any advice on how to deal with this as I don't want to ever tell anybody that they can't do something, but I think it would be in their best interest to do other activities as this causes far more distress than it does joy.
Hi Maxpower
As he likes clubbing, then he should continue to go.
You might like to try adding new activities (not replacing, adding) and then if in due course the caree choses to do one of the new ones instead of clubbing so much so be it.
MrsAverage wrote:Hi Maxpower
As he likes clubbing, then he should continue to go.
You might like to try adding new activities (not replacing, adding) and then if in due course the caree choses to do one of the new ones instead of clubbing so much so be it.
Hi MrsAverage,

Thank you greatly for your reply. I agree that if somebody wants to do something then they should be allowed to continue to do so. We already do a great variety of things together but I think it's the idea of clubbing that he finds very exciting rather than the reality which he finds distressing and upsetting.