Help finding Bariatric equipment! And tips!!

Share your ideas about the practical side of caring.
stacey _1705 wrote:Can u get the gp to refer her to occuptaional therapist who will do a assesment at home with your mum and help provide equipment.
We want to buy and find all the equipment needed ourselves. We have current equipment but it's either old and needs replacing or my mom has outgrew so items. I want to find out from other carers what sorts of equipment they would also recommend
Aw right.i wouldnt no where to begin then getting equipment personally. I have always just went through the occuptional therapist for grandmother as was very good making sure it was the right stuff for height weight etc. Sorry i cant be more of a help
stacey _1705 wrote:Aw right.i wouldnt no where to begin then getting equipment personally. I have always just went through the occuptional therapist for grandmother as was very good making sure it was the right stuff for height weight etc. Sorry i cant be more of a help
We are looking for a bed with a very high weight capacity and one hopefully with a built in scale x
Im not sure then sorry.im sure they would be very expensive too but as its needed needs to be got
Hi Matt,
I did care for my obese brother but at the end he was 24 stone and 82. He was not as obese as your mother and he was actually losing weight. He was once 32 stone and put in hospital on a low-calorie diet and his weight went down to 12 stone, but that was decades ago.

You should definitely contact O'T, even if you pay for things yourself. I can't really advise you much. My brother always made do, e.g. buying a bed that was not intended for his weight and later shoring it up on old blocks of wood. I only lived with him for three years. I bought a bariatric hospital bed for him. It was 110 cm wide, an odd size. Later we got an airflow mattress from social services, which had to be made specially for the bed. The bed could be raised so the careworkers did not hurt their backs when they were washing him. It had no scale in it. We had a ceiling hoist from social services.

I think your best approach is to contact one of the companies who sell this equipment. First Mobility was the last one we used. From what I have read here, I don't think my advice on the other thread about weighing a person on a wheelchair will be of any use to you. It's very difficult. Can your mother get to hospital if she needs to? My brother could go out into the garden and through the garage on a wheelchair - the front porch is too complicated and narrow to manoeuvre. I think you definitely need OT's advice on all this. For instance, they gave us complete plans for a ramp. We decided not to build it, but they did advise us.
Greta wrote:Hi Matt,
I did care for my obese brother but at the end he was 24 stone and 82. He was not as obese as your mother and he was actually losing weight. He was once 32 stone and put in hospital on a low-calorie diet and his weight went down to 12 stone, but that was decades ago.

You should definitely contact O'T, even if you pay for things yourself. I can't really advise you much. My brother always made do, e.g. buying a bed that was not intended for his weight and later shoring it up on old blocks of wood. I only lived with him for three years. I bought a bariatric hospital bed for him. It was 110 cm wide, an odd size. Later we got an airflow mattress from social services, which had to be made specially for the bed. The bed could be raised so the careworkers did not hurt their backs when they were washing him. It had no scale in it. We had a ceiling hoist from social services.

I think your best approach is to contact one of the companies who sell this equipment. First Mobility was the last one we used. From what I have read here, I don't think my advice on the other thread about weighing a person on a wheelchair will be of any use to you. It's very difficult. Can your mother get to hospital if she needs to? My brother could go out into the garden and through the garage on a wheelchair - the front porch is too complicated and narrow to manoeuvre. I think you definitely need OT's advice on all this. For instance, they gave us complete plans for a ramp. We decided not to build it, but they did advise us.
Hey thanks again. I've sent you a pm. I hope to hear of you!! Why would the other advice about the scale be irrelevant
It would be irrelevant if she can't get into a wheelchair.

It will not help you to PM me, because I did not have your situation.

There are actually a lot of doctors and others who think obesity is purely a problem of self-control. It isn't that simple. But you have to be lucky with your doctor.
Greta wrote:It would be irrelevant if she can't get into a wheelchair.

It will not help you to PM me, because I did not have your situation.

There are actually a lot of doctors and others who think obesity is purely a problem of self-control. It isn't that simple. But you have to be lucky with your doctor.


That's fine and understandable. No we are not able to find a wheelchair that she an fit into. I guess we will have to use our current scale until it gets maxed out. Do u know of anyplace that we could get a wheelchair for her size? Even that mobility would be great!
I did post a link to First Mobility - sorry, it's First Call Mobility - on the other thread - here it is again:

https://www.1stcallmobility.co.uk/produ ... air-scales

I don't have any connection with them but they are one company selling this kind of thing.

I should add that in the three years I was dealing with my brother, I made some wrong decisions. You should most definitely get advice from the Occupational Therapy department at your council. I do not know who would advise you at First Call Mobility. Some care equipment providers have showrooms where they might talk to you. I have not been to such a showroom.

My brother could originally move around a bit, but kept falling. Eventually he bought a wheelchair. It was too small, but easy to move. OT eventually contacted the wheelchair services department, who provided a bigger one. Three of our doors had to be widened to 1 m. so the wheelchair plus my brother's hands could fit through them. But the wheelchair was so heavy that he could not really move it himself. As he received disability living allowance, he could have paid to rent an electric wheelchair under the motability scheme. But he was getting very confused and we never applied for one. He could not sit up on a motability vehicle so he could not go out. He went to hospital through double doors into the garden, and we had to add double doors to the back of the garage.

The wheelchair which he sat in for a few hours a day was not suitable, but OT didn't tell us that. One day when I was out and the hoist broke down, he was left sitting in the wheelchair and decided to throw himself on the ground because he was so uncomfortable. He must have hurt himself. We later bought a luxurious recliner. He had to be hoisted into it. He was sitting in the wheel chair for 2 years before anyone told us it was bad for his skin. He had no airflow cushion on it either. It was better for him to sit up and change his position though. I do not know if your mother can actually sit up.

Do you have careworkers coming in to help? You will hurt yourself if you try to move your mother.
Greta wrote:I did post a link to First Mobility - sorry, it's First Call Mobility - on the other thread - here it is again:

https://www.1stcallmobility.co.uk/produ ... air-scales

I don't have any connection with them but they are one company selling this kind of thing.

I should add that in the three years I was dealing with my brother, I made some wrong decisions. You should most definitely get advice from the Occupational Therapy department at your council. I do not know who would advise you at First Call Mobility. Some care equipment providers have showrooms where they might talk to you. I have not been to such a showroom.

My brother could originally move around a bit, but kept falling. Eventually he bought a wheelchair. It was too small, but easy to move. OT eventually contacted the wheelchair services department, who provided a bigger one. Three of our doors had to be widened to 1 m. so the wheelchair plus my brother's hands could fit through them. But the wheelchair was so heavy that he could not really move it himself. As he received disability living allowance, he could have paid to rent an electric wheelchair under the motability scheme. But he was getting very confused and we never applied for one. He could not sit up on a motability vehicle so he could not go out. He went to hospital through double doors into the garden, and we had to add double doors to the back of the garage.

The wheelchair which he sat in for a few hours a day was not suitable, but OT didn't tell us that. One day when I was out and the hoist broke down, he was left sitting in the wheelchair and decided to throw himself on the ground because he was so uncomfortable. He must have hurt himself. We later bought a luxurious recliner. He had to be hoisted into it. He was sitting in the wheel chair for 2 years before anyone told us it was bad for his skin. He had no airflow cushion on it either. It was better for him to sit up and change his position though. I do not know if your mother can actually sit up.

Do you have careworkers coming in to help? You will hurt yourself if you try to move your mother.
She can't actually sit herself up bur her bed can move her to a sitting position. No I don't habe carers who come in. When she is moved she's moved with a sling