new member - not waving but drowning :/

Tell us a bit about yourself here.
You can order groceries from your own computer to be delivered to a different address. If you have power of attorney then it shouldn't be a problem. But is he able to answer the door.? There is usually an hour's time slot on home deliveries, so it may mean you or someone would need to be there to accept and put the groceries away.
This could coincide with one of the four carers visits, so that should be easily resolved.
I can order the groceries to be delivered to his home but we've agreed he never answers the door. This is because he used to leave the door open all day long, and strangers have walked in, before now. I have concerns that, if he answers the door to anyone of ill intent, all they need do is push him over and raid the house.

In any case, it takes him about five minutes to get to the door and he always tried to rush to get there before the caller gets fed up. That puts him in danger of falling or overdoing it to such an extent he could suffer ill effects for a couple of days afterwards. He already has incidents where he finds it difficult to breathe for a few hours if he tries to bend down. If he falls over, he has his fall button, but the effects are to put additional strain on the ambulance service and that I'd be rung to go round. It also has a long-lasting effect on his confidence. He went into hospital for the fifth time in seven years back in the spring, due to (a) repeated falls and (b) becoming so frightened by that he didn't leave his chair for two days.

I realise I could hand out the keysafe number but I'm loath to do that. It's bad enough that the Care Agency gave it to the physio when she rang them up and asked for it. (That was a problem incident in other ways - the keysafe number was just icing on the cake). There's also the problem that the care assistants don't always turn up on time (sound familiar?), which means the stuff could be sitting in the hallway for more than hour. Not so good for fridge stuff. :( Besides, it would bother my father to such an extent he'll get into a tizzy or - worse - try to bend down to pick it up and put it away. This is a man who, at the moment, can only walk by relying on a forearm walker (a souped-up zimmer frame he can lean on with his forearms). Even then, he moves at teh speed of a tortoise.

Any ideas round this are really appreciated!
I'm not sure supermarkets would accept key coeds anyway-liability and all that? Perhaps you could arrange a delivery time when you can be available yourself. I always get a late delivery 9-10 or 10-11 so it doesn't get in the way of aything else. If you pop round a few times a week could you combine the delivery slot- at least it saves you doing the shopping and I have found them to be very reliable and always turn up in the appointed hour slot that I have booked.
Have you thought about getting a large plastic storage box (I'm a fan of Really Useful Boxes) which could be left out of sight. Then the delivery people could just leave everything in the box, rather than disturb dad, and the carers could unpack for him. An evening delivery of "fridge" food would come to no harm for an hour or two. Such an arrangement would be fine at my rural home, but not so in other places.
From what you have just written, dad is on the verge of needing long term residential care. Has this ever been discussed or properly considered? How does he manage getting to the toilet or bed?
bowlingbun wrote:
Sun Nov 05, 2017 1:30 pm
Have you thought about getting a large plastic storage box (I'm a fan of Really Useful Boxes) which could be left out of sight. Then the delivery people could just leave everything in the box, rather than disturb dad, and the carers could unpack for him. An evening delivery of "fridge" food would come to no harm for an hour or two. Such an arrangement would be fine at my rural home, but not so in other places.
Oh, that's a distinct possibility. Many thanks for that!
From what you have just written, dad is on the verge of needing long term residential care. Has this ever been discussed or properly considered? How does he manage getting to the toilet or bed?
He refuses to consider a nursing home. He goes to the toilet by himself. If he's caught short, I've provided him with a couple of hospital pee bottles. He keeps one by himself at all times and the other by his bed. He's only been caught short otherwise once. He has a commode in the room he spends most of his time in, during the day, though he won't use it. He goes to bed by himself. The care assistants are there to put moisturising cream on every visit, wash him, prepare meals and see he's changed for bed. They also use the washing machine, hang the clothes on a dryer and put them away, make his bed, put the hoover over a couple of rooms etc