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Advice, where to go?

Posted: Fri Sep 29, 2017 10:48 am
by Arron_1709
Hi there I am a 33 year old guy with epilepsy and live with my grandfather of 83. For past five years I had been on DLA then ESA which now has been stopped and been placed on basic JSA. In this time I have been caring for my grandad, mostly general housework and cooking aswell as budgeting. About two years ago my grandad was assessed and came out with both lower rate for both care/mobility, mostly as he is of the ''older generation'' that never like getting something for nothing. Now with my situation financially and a local care assessors advice( they were part of the housing who came to asses my grandads need for a wet room as bath too hard for him to get in out.) How do I go about getting my grandad reassessed as this will help in our needs for the wetroom and also give me an opportunity to apply for carers allowance if he comes back in mid/high range. Any help would be appreciated, it's been hard few months and the added stress really doesn't help me with my seizures.

Re: Advice, where to go?

Posted: Fri Sep 29, 2017 11:20 am
by Chris From The Gulag
Your local LA , Social Services section is your first port of call :

http://www.caredirections.co.uk/role-of ... -services/


Assessment for Community Care

Since 1993, local authorities and, through them, their social services departments, have been charged with; assessing people’s needs for community care services; and, where they have agreed that there is a need, with providing an appropriate service. Health authorities and, where appropriate, other professionals such as physiotherapists, are also required to take part in assessments.

‘Assessing needs’ simply means finding out what help or support you may need. The remit is to provide services which support people in their own homes, or to provide a placement in a care home. In either case, subject to a financial means test, there is likely to be a charge for services.

The only exception to this is where there is an assessed need for continuing health care, hospital or care from the district nurse, or when there is a short term need for rehabilitation. In such cases, the service will be provided free of charge.

People living in care homes receive free nursing care, but only when the nursing is carried out by a qualified nurse. There is a complicated ‘banding’ system which then determines just what discount you will receive. The accommodation and non-nursing costs will still have to be paid for.


In essence , a full MOT for both you and your caree.

Needless to say , the dreaded post code lottery applies ... some are less efficient than others ... some more so ... the old glass half full scenario.

Do your homework carefully .... some SS departments are notorious for not offering vital information ... if you don't ask , you don't get.

There are " Obligations " imposed on LAs regarding the time frame ... first application to first assessment ... note the use of the word OBLIGATIONS ... regretably , some LAs tend to ignore them completely as others have reported.

Let us know how you get on so that we may add , if demned appropriate , your LA to our Christmas card list ... 3 made it last year ... an all time record !

On the finances side , your local CAB or the Carers UK advice team will talk you through that MOT once you have all the options presented to you.

As carers , we tend , by nature , to expect the worst. Anything other would be a result. It's in our genes .... as carers.

Others may be along later to pad out some of the above.

Re: Advice, where to go?

Posted: Wed Oct 04, 2017 10:24 am
by bowlingbun
Welcome to the forum.

There are three different authorities involved in what you have mentioned.
Firstly, benefits, DWP.
"Something for Nothing"!! Absolutely NOT. Grandad has paid National Insurance all his working life I expect, and this is his pay back from his INSURANCE.
Can I ask what is wrong with granddad? Would it be possible for him to live alone without your help?
I would suggest that you get some help and advice filling out the Attendance Allowance form, it's a bid daunting. If he was assessed as needing the lower rate 2 years ago, things have clearly changed if he now needs a wet room and help with having a bath/shower. Needing this sort of help is one of the things which is important to stress when claiming AA.

Secondly, the local housing authority.
These are the people who pay for alterations to make wet rooms etc. The official term is a "Disabled Facilities Grant" sometimes shortened to DFG. Usually arranged after an Occupational Therapists visit.

Thirdly, Social Services from the local authority/County Council.
They are responsible for doing
a Needs Assessment for Grandad, and
a Carers Assessment for you (regardless of whether or not you get Carers Allowance).
They should make sure you get time away from caring to enjoy yourself, i.e. belong to a group, go for a walk, etc. etc.

I hope that helps. Can I ask where your parents are in all this? I always worry about a young person expected to care for a parent, as they have a different outlook on life. I worry even more when it's a grandparent slowing down towards the end of life, when you are in your prime. If you are not happy caring for granddad, it's OK to say here, we don't judge.