Stuff! What to do with it all.....

For anyone who is bereaved or no longer providing care.
What on earth do you do with all the stuff you have left over? A bed, commode, toilet risers almost new etc etc etc.

Don't get me going on pads, catheters bags etc that they just want to dispose of.

Medication as well.

There must be somewhere it can all go to be recycled rather than just dumped in landfill. There must be a charity wanting it for third world countries. Help please?
Do you think a local hospice might be able to use them?
Meds are a real pain - even unopened ones have to be destroyed 'officially'. SUCH a waste. I wonder if a charity like Medicins Sans Frontieres (MSF) would accept them? They seem to be a 'no-red-tape' kind of organisation, that just go in and get on with the job, so maybe they are less bureaucracy-bound than UK charities have to be?? Just a thought.
If physical aids (ie bed, commode, toilet frames etc) have been supplied via Social Services or the OT's they should have a little label on them somewhere that gives details of the company that supplied them - ring them and ask them to collect. (We were actually asked by our OT's to advise them when the items were no longer required!)

Most charity shops will accept walking frames / wheelchairs providing they are in good serviceable condition - ditto unopened packs of incontinence pads.

Medication should always be returned to the pharmacy for disposal.
I took pads to the local Age UK day centre. They always come in handy!
Pads, wipes, inco sheets, gloves, drainage bags etc, as long as you have sealed unopened packs, places like Drs practices, District nurses services will make use of them, though they will reject any opened packs.

Meds though are a real pain, as soon as they are handed to you over the pharmacy counter, opened or nay, they have to be destroyed. I couldn't fine anywhere, legal, where you could hand them over to a charity to be used in developing countries :( I used to work for MSF, even going through back channels it's 'dodgy'

And as the other have said, most of the big aids, when supplied usually go back to the agency who supplied them. (in my case they didn't hang about contacting me for their return.

Though I still have a used Wheelchair accessible vehicle we bought 5 weeks ago,, now with no wheelchair user to fit in it. (handy for trips to the tip though)
Most of the 'stuff'I have is mine. I bought it as SS had already kitted dads house out, so when he came to me I just bought it. Simple as that. It doesn't have to be returned to anyone. I just want it to go to a good home.

I have offered the district nurses the leg bags etc but the are overflowing with it at the moment. We are such a throw away society. It really is quite sad to know that there are people in other countries needing things and we are here throwing it away and at the same time complaining about lack of money in the NHS. Tis a crazy world thats for sure.
Woodlass wrote:Most of the 'stuff'I have is mine. I bought it as SS had already kitted dads house out, so when he came to me I just bought it. Simple as that. It doesn't have to be returned to anyone. I just want it to go to a good home.

I have offered the district nurses the leg bags etc but the are overflowing with it at the moment. We are such a throw away society. It really is quite sad to know that there are people in other countries needing things and we are here throwing it away and at the same time complaining about lack of money in the NHS. Tis a crazy world thats for sure.
Woodlass put it all on Freecycle - not meds, obviously, but everything else, there's bound to be other people in the process of kitting out for a relative or who can use pads etc.
The hosp dept came and collected our double rise and fall all singing bed, supplied by NHS. I was under the impression it was going to be cleaned and re-assigned to a married couple who needed a double r&f bed. Instead, the technicians ripped it all to pieces, tore out all the screws and mechanical workings in it and said they didn't re-issue beds. What a waste of an expensive bed. Ditto, with our previous, smaller double rise and fall bed, which I was told was being taken to the Red Cross depot - not on your nelly it wasn't, again scrapped.
I was disgusted.
Medications were put into bin bags and bro in law and I took to chemist (again for disposal) and unopened bedsheets, pads, leg bags, sheaths, blue paper towel rolls, dry wipes - all sealed and unused (we always kept loads of spare stocks of everything) were taken to chemist. I was told that nobody would accept these such things, even though totally sealed and still sterile etc.
Good luck really with all this, why doesn't anyone make it easier for us with regard to these things and equipment. Sorry to be so negative, but my experience of what to do with these things wasn't a positive one.
Recently got a couple of items of equipment from the British Red Cross. Maybe they would be glad to have some of your equipment that they can pass on to someone else ???