Employment after caring?

For anyone who is bereaved or no longer providing care.
Up until recently I had been a full time carer all my adult life, this past decade for my father who had late stage vascular dementia.

I now I find myself trying to find work with a yawning chasm on my CV. Even though I have an OU degree and an OU Diploma in Computing, both are now 18 years old, and so unlikely to impress an employer.

I was wondering if anyone else is or has been in this position, and if so, how things worked out?

How did you solve the empty CV problem? I'm even stuck on what to put down as interests, it's not like I've had any time for a life of my own.

Did you find that public bodies were more likely to give you a chance at employment or was it necessary to take part time temporary shop work?

David
Perhaps I shouldn't say this to you, but a while back there was a discussion on this forum about a government initiative (or at least, a statement of desire on their part!) to recruit former family carers, like you, to 'swap across' to caring for other people's elderly parents.....to solve that devilish problem of 'what to do about looking after all the old people in the UK'.....(!!!!!!!!!)

I can remember being pretty incandescent about the idea - obviously no one in the government has ever had to give up their own life for their parents, or they would have kept their privileged stupid mouths shut!!!!

That said, quite a few people thought it was a good idea, and, after all, this time around they would actually get paid! And since it would be a job, they would have control, and freedom - things we don't get while we are family carers.

Wishing you all the best - perhaps one 'half way house' might be to do some 'professional careworking' and simultaneously refresh your OU qualifications to transition to non-carework??
jenny lucas wrote:Perhaps I shouldn't say this to you, but a while back there was a discussion on this forum about a government initiative (or at least, a statement of desire on their part!) to recruit former family carers, like you, to 'swap across' to caring for other people's elderly parents.....to solve that devilish problem of 'what to do about looking after all the old people in the UK'.....(!!!!!!!!!)

I can remember being pretty incandescent about the idea - obviously no one in the government has ever had to give up their own life for their parents, or they would have kept their privileged stupid mouths shut!!!!
When my Grandma died my father was approached to see if he would volunteer to drive needy souls to hospital appointments - he said he was 'cared out' and had been for years thank you very much! Got his point across!!

David is there any chance you could contact a local IT company and ask if you could shadow someone free of charge for a while to enable you to draw up a training needs analysis or if they knew of any 'refresh access to work' type courses in your speciality nearby? Alternatively are there any access to work courses anyway where you can consider how transferable some of the skills you have acquired may be to other roles?
@Jenny
My Jobcentre advisor told me that he had one client who was trying to make the transition from carer to professional care worker. Apparently, whenever he goes to an interview they make a big deal about him having no experience! They're probably worried he might blow the whistle on bad practice.

@Denise
It's definitely something to keep in mind, although training courses never seem to focus on individual needs.


My current plan is to look for part time retail work whilst I refresh my programming skills at home. However I hear that Jobcentre staff are now encouraged to sanction as many people as possible, and so half expect this to happen to me at some point.

Hopefully, once I am confident again, I will be able to write applications for Android phones. It doesn't have to bring in a lot of money but it would be nice to be independent.

Although I have the greatest respect for those still struggling. Being a carer has cost me dearly over the past thirty years and I need a break from it. Above all I'd like to meet someone, because these past years have been extremely lonely. I call it being an involuntary loner, because I never really wanted to be alone.

David
Perhaps he is not very good at getting across exactly what he's been doing at home, or perhaps secretly not that keen on professional care and going through the motions to keep job centre happy.
It is worth a look if you are interested as a stepping stone.
I can understand why somebody might do that, after all caring is utterly exhausting and its not like they give us much time to recover from it.

I will keep professional care as an option in case other avenues do not work out. I have a month to find something in the retail sector, failing that its been suggested I go on a call centre course. Either way, I'm going to refresh my programming skills while I'm looking.

David
I did finally manage to find employment, a temporary part time stockroom job. Which believe me is ideal at this stage, caring for someone over their terminal years takes everything you have and I've come to realise that this takes time to recover from.

I also manage to volunteer for AgeUK, although I found out that I still lack the energy to do more than a token amount right now.

Now I just need to build on this, and perhaps do something about this loneliness.

Thank you for the support, help and advice over the past couple of years.

David
Hi David
Thanks for the update- that is good news and inspirational for others putting a toe in the water again.