The Falls Team?

Share information, support and advice on all aspects of caring.
Hello Pope_Pourri,

I have just watched the video on the link you sent. It's very useful and sensible advice. If my sister has another fall and is obviously unhurt, I will try the method of getting her on to her knees. Actually, if she can do this, she may well be able to get herself up with just a bit of help. This would be a great comfort to me and my husband. She has a low sturdy stool, which I think would be the thing to use.
Thanks for taking the trouble to post.
Greta.
You're very welcome, hope it helps in some way.
I've found as I watch MIL move around, she seems to struggle because she's trying to do stuff the exact same way she always did it, whether it's getting in and out of the car, or walking down the stairs, or getting up after a fall. If you can observe a person doing those sorts of things, you can see where they have problems and make changes.
For instance, when we were house-hunting I noticed she was struggling to get down stairs because she was having difficulty with taking her weight on her back foot and transferring it down to the front one as she stepped down. It made her wobble as her balance is not too good and she has poor muscle tone. So we turned her around and got her to come down backwards, holding onto the banister and taking more of the strain on her arms. It worked - she was down quick as a flash and with minimal pain.
Sometimes a good physiotherapist can help with teaching someone to move in a different way. It's not easy, because you have to become conscious of your movements and not just do stuff automatically, but it can help to prevent injury in someone who is weak or ill.
If I had an elderly relative fall, I personally would call out the paramedics or GP to do a full examination of the person.
I remember my grandfather falling several times over a period of time, many years ago in my mother's house.
He was diagnosed as having TIA's, he had never suffered a full stroke.
Also, my father in law fell 7 weeks ago and he was able to push the button his wrist alarm and although he had full movement of his limbs and remembered what had happened, he is still in hospital after having had a stroke.

Christina
I've resurrected this thread again because I had a letter this morning from my local authority who are very helpful with care generally.
Dad has the lifeline pendant/wrist band and is prone to falling. The letter advised that the previous service where one of their representatives called for an ambulance to pick up a none injured fallen person was a waste of ambulance resources (which we all know) and often resulted in an elderly person laying on a floor for several hours so they were introducing an extended service from now on. If the lifeline team are called out to a none injured fallen person they are now trained to assist that person back to their feet. Injuries will still be referred to hospital.
I do think our local authority are brilliant - just occasionally.
I think that's a good idea - although over the border in Hampshire there is no "Lifeline Team" but I know a very senior member of the Ambulance Staff and he's happy for his staff to help, doesn't consider it a waste of time at all. (Henrietta and I live only 20 miles apart, but in different counties).
I couldn't agree more that there is an obvious gap in the availability of area teams to assist when a cared for person is on the floor and assistance is needed only to help them back to sitting or standing.
This is such a common occurrence these days and to call out a fully equipped ambulance and its team not only takes those key workers out of circulation and availability for something more serious, but it must also, surely, be very costly. Besides, we are constantly reminded how overworked our ambulance workers are.
Surely it's time that our local authorities should recognise that sometimes (and as in my case) only picker-uppers are needed when (again as in my case) my husband has slipped from a chair or the toilet. I am approaching 74. After recent struggles to get him up by myself, I myself ended up in hospital for a week!
These small incidents do occur!
Let's have some SMALL INCIDENCE TEAMS!
My wife, who btw is the person that falls is currently compiling the data to find out how much money is wasted by the NHS when as already been said in most cases two or three people well trained in triage and lifting could could save £115 per call out that’s not counting the time spent filling forms out and the cost of life to those that really need that level of service. According to age U.K. there are 700.000 falls 10% need no medical assistant . Btw the area we live in used to have a falls team but were deemed to be to costly. :shock:
Dad who is 91 had a fall last night- I rang Lifeline first to try and save ambulance time but when I said his arm was bleeding they said they couldn't use the magic lifting chair on him and they rang paramedics for me. His bleeding was under control but the crew arrived in less than an hour at 5.30 AM, although on other occasions I have had longer to wait and once it must have been well over 2 or 3 hours but no bleeding. From the conversation I had last night it seems they waste far more time attending alcohol induced incidents than they do the fallen elderly.
To my mind, any ambulance attending a patient who is, say, over the driving limit for alcohol, should be forced to pay at least £50 on the spot, even if they have to take a credit card to do so!

It's insane what this country puts up with.

Sorry, completely useless comment, but there you go. Grrr.
Henrietta wrote:
Sat Oct 28, 2017 6:08 pm
Dad who is 91 had a fall last night- I rang Lifeline first to try and save ambulance time but when I said his arm was bleeding they said they couldn't use the magic lifting chair on him and they rang paramedics for me. His bleeding was under control but the crew arrived in less than an hour at 5.30 AM, although on other occasions I have had longer to wait and once it must have been well over 2 or 3 hours but no bleeding. From the conversation I had last night it seems they waste far more time attending alcohol induced incidents than they do the fallen elderly.
I think its coming to the time when they need to charge for any 'over indulgence of alcohol' related call outs and subsequent care.