CHC funding in own home

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My son has just been assessed as being eligible for CHC, the issue seems to be where?
They seem to be suggesting he move to a residential facility which we do not want and don't believe to be in his best interests. My son has severe learning difficulty's and autism but also has a multiple seizure disorder. Social Service wouldn't fully fund to his needs and believed he fell within eligibility for CHC. It would be devastating to all of us if my son was forced into a residential placement, is there any way to stop this from happening, surely this is tantamount to making applying for help with care needs completely off the table as a risk to having someone forcibly removed from their own home.
MaryB wrote:My son has just been assessed as being eligible for CHC, the issue seems to be where?
They seem to be suggesting he move to a residential facility which we do not want and don't believe to be in his best interests. My son has severe learning difficulty's and autism but also has a multiple seizure disorder. Social Service wouldn't fully fund to his needs and believed he fell within eligibility for CHC. It would be devastating to all of us if my son was forced into a residential placement, is there any way to stop this from happening, surely this is tantamount to making applying for help with care needs completely off the table as a risk to having someone forcibly removed from their own home.
Hiya Mary, Yep what you are dealing with here is that 'old chestnut' Social Care/Health bring out on a regular basis as a 'scaremonger'. It's a regular thing these days for them to 'suggest' residential facilities or supported living instead of care in the home. If Social Services have done 'an assessment' as in sent in an OT then they normally brief the OT when doing a functional assessment to 'recommend' residential or supported living. Unless all agree such as Social Care plus Health team you'll probably hear no more about it. Plus if your son has mental capacity he can say he doesn't want to go and wants his care in the home and if he doesn't have capacity well you can mention all the reasons why he shouldn't go. What you do have to make certain you don't do is mention anything like for example you 'don't want him to go'. I would very much steer away from that one if I was you as they will use it for their 'case' to force and always base your case only on your son and his needs only. You could mention it wouldn't work because of X,Y and Z. One thing you could mention is that you think if it went ahead he may end up in a hospital facility(they would immediately start thinking of how much that would cost them) and his 'behaviour wouldn't be stable and why...If that may be the case. Don't be bullied or intimidated by these people. Go to Court if necessary to prevent it. In the meantime demand, the funding is made available to use in the home.Keep a log of how it's working within the home as well. If your son has capacity he may want you to do the care in which case he'll need to tell them that and you may be able to be paid from their fund:) You take care and don't let these people browbeat you into submission XX
Congratulations on being awarded CHC. If you all feel it's better for him to be at home with support, then that is what should be provided. Have a look at the CHC Framework online.
Thanks for the information, the thought of more fighting is so overwhelming but there is a real fear that my son would be hospitalized possibly under section. The only way they would avoid a section or even manage would be using powerful anti psychotics which are unnecessary with the high level care we give at home.
I'm really confused as to why they would prefer out of county residential placements, surely even with minimum package it would be more expensive so it looks like a tactic to scare people off, who, like me would consider it in their sons best interest he live with his family.
The whole best interest meeting is a nonsense anyway, in cases of abuse or neglect it certainly has an important place but surely parents and carers who know the person best are generally the only ones who can speak with any knowledge of what is right for the person they care for. It really looks like best interest actually means best result for the authorities and they have the final say.
MaryB wrote:Thanks for the information, the thought of more fighting is so overwhelming but there is a real fear that my son would be hospitalized possibly under section. The only way they would avoid a section or even manage would be using powerful anti psychotics which are unnecessary with the high level care we give at home.
I'm really confused as to why they would prefer out of county residential placements, surely even with minimum package it would be more expensive so it looks like a tactic to scare people off, who, like me would consider it in their sons best interest he live with his family.
The whole best interest meeting is a nonsense anyway, in cases of abuse or neglect it certainly has an important place but surely parents and carers who know the person best are generally the only ones who can speak with any knowledge of what is right for the person they care for. It really looks like best interest actually means best result for the authorities and they have the final say.
Mary don't back down on it...Have they had a 'best interests meeting' about it yet?..Best interest are as you know about saving 10 pence if necessary to these people. How old is your son? How long has he been at home as an adult?...Anti-Psychotics no way as they increase seizure activity and they know this. Don't tolerate it, at the same time and I know you will have to bite your tongue...work with them to prevent it..Know what I mean?
Mary you may have to brace yourself for the fight them...but do so and try hard not to allow anger into it...Base fact and keep basing fact ;)
Congratulations Mary, for securing CHC. You surely made a right decision for him.
Hi Mary,

I suggest contacting the Challenging Behaviour Foundation http://www.challengingbehaviour.org.uk They offer support to families in similiar situations to yours and understand how the wrong setting can trigger what is then considered to be challenging behaviour.

I would also suggest getting your son an advocate, they will be able to put forward the case of why being at home is best e.g. seizures better managed, people who know him well so are able to support his need for routine, his sensory needs, understand his attempts at communicating etc etc They will be another person on your side.

Melly1
Read the Framework, and then look at you local CCCG website - I know Hampshire has a special section all about where someone is cared for, and if it meets various human rights to have a different from normal placement it's OK to pay an extra 10% above the usual rate. It's a while ago since I looked at all this for mum, so you need to do a bit of up to date research. Then print off the bits which apply and tell them what their own documents say. Often, they are not as familiar as they should be with their own policies. They can argue with your opinion but can't argue against their own policies. Believe me, this works. (A long time ago I studied law).
Thanks everyone for the help. Bowlingbun I checked out the CCG website and very clearly my son should receive a personal budget and not a commissioned service, been up so late reading and printing but knowledge is everything. Wish I'd known before I went to the assessment but wasn't really expecting them to agree in the first place!