To complain to DWP re:WASPI site Pension Inequality

Socialise and chat about other areas of your life
79 posts
NanaNana wrote:I'm 1959 and had no idea about this.
Will you sign the government online petition?
Annie_15052 wrote:Hi, new to the group. I added it to my Facebook page. Want to get it to as many fifty somethings as possible.
I was medically retired 5 yrs ago, one year later my son had a brain haemorrhage which has left him pretty disabled now. I now look and watch after him. It's a funny old life. I really could have done with having my state pension now. It's obvious to anyone who sees me that I will never work again, severe scoliosis and kyphosis, I get very tired and breathless. I get ESA Support Group therefore no carers allowance. I will be 61 in a couple of weeks, so only 5 more years to go!!!
I started my working life at 15 expecting to retire at 60. All us ladies born after 1953 have been penalised.
How absolutely awful for you! Women should be given the option when to take their pension. The government just want to add a small amount to the current pension. Quality of life over will I need a few extra pounds. I am a caring and wanted to retire at the same time as my husband. Who will be 72 before I get my pension at 66. What do the government think we will be active enough to do then.
Parliament will be debating the petition signed by approx 150,000 women TOMORROW 1st Feb.

The petition is "make fair transitional State Pension arrangements for 1950s women."

It affects hundreds of thousands of women but women born between 6 April 1953 and 6 October 1954 will be hit Twice because of it being accelerated.

Watch it live parliamentlive.tv
there are lots of changes happening: my wife was born in 1952 and is still working. She is one of the in-betweenies: forced to work to 62 to get her pension, she enjoys good health and has now worked two years past pensionalble age, not drawing her pension. As a result of deferring state pension she will get an extra 11% index linked increase in perpetuity until death for every year she doesn't claim it. This perk is so popular - as people live so much longer now that 11% per annum rise has to be a great deal - that the government recently has reduced the value of deferring by half to 5.5 %. Another great pension deal down the swannie... :dry:
For anyone on Carers Benefit, this deferred pensions deal does not apply, by the way, you lose your CA at 65 and have to claim state pension.

I'm lucky - the age for retirement for men born in 1953 shifts from 65 to 66 just a few days after my birthday on 27th November. :silly:
Live parliamentary debate scheduled for 4.30pm today. This is the link given on their website http://goo.gl/J9DAgj.
The more I look into this mess the worse it is.

My friend is just 6 months older than me. She will get her state pension from this July. I have to wait until July 2018 so another two years and lose out on approx £17,000 compared to her. How can that be right or fair?
It isn't. It's a real mess, and it affects carers and widows hugely, I don't think anyone ever thought it through, or even cared. I was widowed at the age of 54. There is no Widows Pension any more for someone in my situation, only Bereavement Allowance which lasts for just one year. Three months after my OH died, I was seriously disabled in a car crash, couldn't walk at all without terrible pain. Normal work out of the question. My husband restored vintage lorries, and had significant stock (30 tons!). I gradually sold them to earn money, but it was incredibly difficult, my eldest son had to help me. My husband wanted to pay into a private pension for me when I was young. Government regulations prohibited this as I wasn't working, just saving the state thousands of pounds each year caring for our son with severe learning difficulties. When I finished my degree about 20 years ago, I was offered a really good job, but with no other care available in the area, I had to turn it down.
I'm left feeling that the needs of women still don't matter.
bowlingbun wrote:It isn't. It's a real mess, and it affects carers and widows hugely, I don't think anyone ever thought it through, or even cared. I was widowed at the age of 54. There is no Widows Pension any more for someone in my situation, only Bereavement Allowance which lasts for just one year. Three months after my OH died, I was seriously disabled in a car crash, couldn't walk at all without terrible pain. Normal work out of the question. My husband restored vintage lorries, and had significant stock (30 tons!). I gradually sold them to earn money, but it was incredibly difficult, my eldest son had to help me. My husband wanted to pay into a private pension for me when I was young. Government regulations prohibited this as I wasn't working, just saving the state thousands of pounds each year caring for our son with severe learning difficulties. When I finished my degree about 20 years ago, I was offered a really good job, but with no other care available in the area, I had to turn it down.
I'm left feeling that the needs of women still don't matter.
Sorry to read all this Bowlingbun. the pensions mess is the biggest mess I've ever come across. there was an "expert" on BBC news this morning and she actually said that "women now retire at 60 and men at 65". Where has she been lately? :lol: :lol:
. there was an "expert" on BBC news this morning and she actually said that "women now retire at 60 and men at 65". Where has she been lately?
My retirement age is now 67. There is no way I will be able to carry on doing what I do to that age ... I foresee an attempt to change career ahead. Not easy though the older you get. It's all very well nodding off in the House of Lords every day. Quite another to be doing a manual labour job, nursing, teaching young / special needs children etc

Melly1
This effects other areas i.e. getting a bus pass, applying for other benefits. I currently live in a village and the return journey is nearlry £8.00 a day. Not sure where I would get that kind of money for transport. I think even if we don't get our pension until 66 for me. We should be able to get a bus pass at 60 if we are still carers. I may have to look at moving back to town in a couple of years. Dr Cameron said,"plan for retirement". Yes OK David. Stop moving my retirement date and I will. First 65 then 66.
79 posts