Planet Earth 11 and sound problems

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Loved this evenings program but my LV TV doesn't like this series. The sound volume keeps going really quiet and then returning to normal volume so I have to keep playing with the remote control. For once Dad is not to blame. I have noticed the same problem over the last 2 weeks and just for this one series.
It seems rather strange as I am sure the BBC have good quality production on such a flagship series.
My LV TV has the Clear Voice function turned on always but the volume never dips up and down for anything else.
Anyone else noticed it or got any suggestions? :?:
When the BBC had a message board, sound balance was one of THE biggest moans - so, sadly, you are not alone. (The BBC's solution was to close down the message board.)

I've certainly noticed poor sound balance - some voices too quiet, then incredibly loud 'background noise' - in dramas, and I'm constantly fiddling about with the volume.

I suspect the producers try to be 'clever' and it backfires.

Good luck with PEII. I never watch these programmes, despite the incredibly photography, as they usually involve animals eating each other etc. Too horrible.

I found the opening to tonights on the jungle very depressing - it said jungles were Earth's Eden, but ruined by overpopulation, so all the animals have to compete ferociously.

True of the whole planet when it comes to humans, sigh.
Sorry Henrietta - didn't have a problem on my TV. The only time I've noticed a decrease in the volume is when David Attenborough or one of the film crew might be whispering so as not to disturb the animals

and sorry Jenny but cannot agree with you - Planet Earth is the most amazing programme on TV at the moment (well 11+ million viewers can't all be wrong !). Scenes of animals killing and eating each other are kept to an absolute minimum because the producers are mindful of the fact that the programme is recorded, or watched via Catch Up TV, to be watched by children the following day. If I remember correctly last night there was only one such instance and that was remarkable - a jaguar catching a cayman :shock: (Apparently they have the strongest bite of any of the big cats) but they didn't follow through with the eating part. And animals eating each other is no worse than us devouring our roast beef or lamb - except ours is cooked and their's is raw ! After all there isn't a Sainsbury's in the jungle :roll:
We've had this problem in recent weeks with various programmes, "our normal" volume one minute, then volume dropping, then going loud because we've turned volume up because it has dropped.
Susie, you're right - ie, in that one can hardly be squeamish if one is prepared to eat dead animals oneself (as I am!). But I don't like seeing it happen on film. I guess I feel the camera man should intervene to save the threatened prey. (That said, I would happily see all crocs/alligators - and sharks too maybe! - confined to an island or inland sea where they only had each other to eat - horrid creatures!).

I'm glad they are not over-doing the sex-and-violence in the animal kingdom on PEII, but a fragment I watched of the previous programme had a dreadful scene of vile snakes all racing down from rocks on the beach to eat up little newly hatched lizards. Horrible! most escaped, but obviously not all.

I know nature is red and tooth and claw, but I don't actually see any benefit to us to 'revel' in watching it. I find it somewhat pornographic, if I'm honest. Voyeuristic. Not morally acceptable (if I really want to put my high hat on!!!!!!)

The counter argument of course is that I'm merely being deeply and repellently hypocritical, as I want to enjoy the benefits of dead animals (meat, leather, etc) without the 'ordeal' of seeing them killed.

On my perfect planet I guess all animals would be herbivores or scavengers (eating up things that died of a peaceful old age!).... but with good birth controls inset so the population never exceeds the carrying capacity of the environment.....(ie, without the population control that predation imposes)