Health and Social Services needs to be Re-organised

Socialise and chat about other areas of your life
I may be out of step on this, but I don't think it is solely about money in the NHS.
There is too much political interference in my opinion.

People talk about "Economy of Scale". But equally I think there can be
Inefficiency when an organisation is too big
The reason NHS and Social services are falling apart is because successive governments have set them up to fail so to accommodate future privatisation which has been going on for a number of years now in various areas.

De fund the service in question, spark outcry amongst the general public at the state of the service via media, then present private entities as the knight in shining armour, its been the way of things some decades. Another example of this would be DWP who in spite of spiralling costs are less efficient than they've ever been.

Just take the prison system for example, they aren't meant to be a spa by any stretch of the imagination but look at the state of them in regards to death rates where they are being ran privately.

It stopped being about the public interest long ago, the reason most people get a break in politics is because eventually they have to pay the piper, why else so many politicians endorse policy lining their mates pockets.

Change starts at the top, these people run the country and are supposed to set positive examples, they treat everybody outside the political elite and financial sector, like something they just trod in.

Things are so twisted you can be labelled an extremist/conspirator just for expressing constructive (and accurate) perspectives like what I just have.

Look no further than how disabled and vulnerable persons are treated..
Its not your state of health that disables a person but how society treats you and with talk of going back to the days of medical professionals placing the most infirm into institutions (look into what NHS CHC CCG's are up to) we are going back decades socially, without the 10,000's of deaths perpetrated under idealogical austerity to a point where we don't batter an eye lid.

Just look how many charities have been gagged through government lobbying law.

Disgusting.
Personally I think it's about money (lack of) and over-large organisations that are run by 'the bureaucrats' and not by the clinicians. It's also a chronic lack of skills.

The fat cat CEOs of health trusts are paid a fortune to slam a lid down on the problem, and stifle any protest from within (think how appallingly whistleblowers are treated.)

The lack of skills - especially in nursing, plus radiography and all the other medical skills that are in chronic short supply - is directly due to the governemtn refusing to invest in sufficient training. I believe that, if I remember a new story recently correctly, for the 20k nursing training places offered, there were twice that number of UK applicants.....but no places for them. So, of course, the hospitals have to continually hire in what they can from abroad. Then there is the stress on nurses such that they leave the professional (just as teachers are doing), compounding the problem.

So, yes, it's a lack of money, but money spent on the right things and the right staff.

I don't think there's any 'ideological' drive for privatisation, just a desire to save money....just as the government does with all the other state/public organisations, outsourcing to save a buck or two in the short term, and end up with massive bills to be paid to private companies later on.

Including, of course, the national disgrace of PFI, where trusts were forced to go to PFI companies, signing up to the most horrendous contracts that are costing the NHS up to 8 times the actual cost of the buildings, and landing them with crippling and outrageous maintenance contracts.
I would like to see a clear trail of where the money goes. We seem to pay in more and more yet less and less comes out at the front end.

I'd like to see where it gets removed before it gets to NHS, i.e. at goverment level, then at all the admin levels below, and how much goes to PFIs and then how much at how many management levels there are...

I don't like to decry nurses but at 2 recent outpatients appointments there were an awful lot of people not doing much. Then when I phoned to see how long the referral letter would take was told it would take over a month to reach the top of the typing pile. Somethings must be very wrong in some places.

And then ditto all the above for Social Services :(
Completely agree with you Mrs A!

That example of having to wait for the letter so long is a glaring example of where the NHS is NOT spending the money it should - ie, on secretaries! Ridiculous.

And worse - I was once on a cancer volunteer committee and discovered that it was the ONCOLOGIST who had to write reports and so on (ie, physically type them up!). I objected to spending his HUGE salary (well earned I think) and even HUGER skills (he was a surgeon) on something a clerk could do. Simply because the hospital refused to hire another secretary.