Transport for London- ‘Please offer me a seat’ badge and card

Discuss news stories and political issues that affect carers.
Good news for those who struggle to stand on public transport in London.
We received the following through from TfL today about the new scheme below. Please contact TfL directly if you have any questions about the scheme.
I am getting in touch from the team at Transport for London (TfL) that looks after our relationship with older and disabled people’s organisations, parenting organisations and those representing people with health conditions.

Today we are launching the ‘Please offer me a seat’ badge and card for people who find it difficult to stand when using public transport. The badge and accompanying card were created following requests from customers who struggle to get a seat, as their need is not immediately obvious. The badge and card remove the awkwardness of customers having to explain their need for a seat to others.

Last autumn, we held a six week trial with 1,200 people to test the new badge and card. More than 72 per cent of journeys were found to be easier as a result of the badge, and 98 per cent of people taking part said they would recommend it to somebody who needed it.

As a result, we are now introducing the ‘Please offer me a seat’ initiative permanently. The free badge and card are now available through our website, at http://www.tfl.gov.uk/transport-accessi ... -me-a-seat or by calling us on 0343 222 1234. There are no qualifying criteria - applicants do not need to provide a GP’s note or their medical history. The badge and card can be used across our network, on London Underground, London Overground, Buses, Docklands Light Railway, TfL Rail, Trams and River Services.

I’d be grateful if you would please share this through your own networks. We will be using hashtag #Pleaseoffermeaseat on Twitter, and we would welcome any re-tweets to help spread the word about this important new initiative.

To find out more about how we are making London’s transport network more accessible, please visit www.tfl.gov.uk/accessibility including information about support from staff, maps, guides and leaflets, and other accessible features. You can also follow us on Twitter at @TfLAccess (www.twitter.com/TfLaccess).

I hope this is helpful. If you have any questions about the badge and card, or anything else on accessibility, please get in touch.

Best wishes

TfL’s Accessibility team
Thanks, Nikki.
This has been all over the news in London anyway. I just hope it doesn't have a negative effective on those of us who can't stand long but are too embarrassed to wear it. At the moment I am quite often offered a seat.
Good news ... our caree gets a seat free.

As for us carers , every seat comes with a full fare price tag.

Guide dogs ?

Perhaps not a free seat but , unlike their two legged carers , they travel free.

I suspect that sitting on a seat dressed as a guide dog , alongside our blind caree , does not qualify for free travel ?

Same " Rights " as guide dogs ... please ... see CAMPAIGNS SECTION.
I'm concerned theres no qualifying criteria. It's wide open to abuse and seems doomed to fail eventually because of that.
I could apply for one so I can get a seat on my way to the gym for my marathon training!!!! ;)
MrsAverage wrote:I'm concerned theres no qualifying criteria. It's wide open to abuse and seems doomed to fail eventually because of that.
I could apply for one so I can get a seat on my way to the gym for my marathon training!!!! ;)
My thought too.

Melly1